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Communication about Alzheimer's disease and research among American Indians and Alaska Natives

Communication about Alzheimer's disease and research among American Indians and Alaska Natives BACKGROUNDThe American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population is increasing three times faster than the US population overall.1 It is predicted that by 2050 the number of AI/ANs ages 65 and older will triple to 1,624,000, while the number ages 85 and older will increase 7‐fold to 300,000.2 The largest known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is older age.3 The aging population, combined with a high prevalence of AD risk factors, has sparked growing concern about AD among AI/AN communities.4Despite advances in AD research among non‐Hispanic Whites, little is known about AD prevalence or risk in AI/ANs.5,6 This is partially due to low participation of AI/ANs in AD research.7,8 To increase AI/AN participation in research studies, the Alzheimer's Association and the National Institute on Aging have issued calls to enhance the recruitment of minority older adults in research, and for research on effective strategies for communicating health messages to diverse populations.9,10 Numerous studies have examined the general public's perceptions and understandings of AD,11–16 but few have examined AI/AN perceptions of AD, participation in research, or their preferred information sources. This omission is concerning because designing effective health messaging and increasing participation in research requires examining perceptions and knowledge http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions Wiley

Communication about Alzheimer's disease and research among American Indians and Alaska Natives

Communication about Alzheimer's disease and research among American Indians and Alaska Natives


Abstract

BACKGROUNDThe American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population is increasing three times faster than the US population overall.1 It is predicted that by 2050 the number of AI/ANs ages 65 and older will triple to 1,624,000, while the number ages 85 and older will increase 7‐fold to 300,000.2 The largest known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is older age.3 The aging population, combined with a high prevalence of AD risk factors, has sparked growing concern about AD among AI/AN communities.4Despite advances in AD research among non‐Hispanic Whites, little is known about AD prevalence or risk in AI/ANs.5,6 This is partially due to low participation of AI/ANs in AD research.7,8 To increase AI/AN participation in research studies, the Alzheimer's Association and the National Institute on Aging have issued calls to enhance the recruitment of minority older adults in research, and for research on effective strategies for communicating health messages to diverse populations.9,10 Numerous studies have examined the general public's perceptions and understandings of AD,11–16 but few have examined AI/AN perceptions of AD, participation in research, or their preferred information sources. This omission is concerning because designing effective health messaging and increasing participation in research requires examining perceptions and knowledge

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 the Alzheimer's Association.
eISSN
2352-8737
DOI
10.1002/trc2.12302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUNDThe American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population is increasing three times faster than the US population overall.1 It is predicted that by 2050 the number of AI/ANs ages 65 and older will triple to 1,624,000, while the number ages 85 and older will increase 7‐fold to 300,000.2 The largest known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is older age.3 The aging population, combined with a high prevalence of AD risk factors, has sparked growing concern about AD among AI/AN communities.4Despite advances in AD research among non‐Hispanic Whites, little is known about AD prevalence or risk in AI/ANs.5,6 This is partially due to low participation of AI/ANs in AD research.7,8 To increase AI/AN participation in research studies, the Alzheimer's Association and the National Institute on Aging have issued calls to enhance the recruitment of minority older adults in research, and for research on effective strategies for communicating health messages to diverse populations.9,10 Numerous studies have examined the general public's perceptions and understandings of AD,11–16 but few have examined AI/AN perceptions of AD, participation in research, or their preferred information sources. This omission is concerning because designing effective health messaging and increasing participation in research requires examining perceptions and knowledge

Journal

Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical InterventionsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2022

Keywords: Alzheimer's disease; communication; dementia; education; Indigenous; perception

References