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Complex systems and participatory approaches to address maternal health disparities: Findings from a system dynamics group model building project in North Texas

Complex systems and participatory approaches to address maternal health disparities: Findings... INTRODUCTIONIn the United States (US), maternal mortality is an urgent public health issue (Taylor, 2020). The US maternal mortality rate has steadily increased over the past 30 years (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019b), with nearly 60% of cases considered preventable (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019a). However, significant and persistent racial disparities in maternal mortality exist, as non‐Hispanic Black women (NHBW) experience mortality rates three times higher than their White counterparts—disparities that have remained nearly unchanged for over a decade (MacDorman et al., 2021). Further, these disparities persist even after controlling for factors such as socioeconomic status, health behaviors, and insurance coverage (Taylor, 2020). Ultimately, reducing the prevalence of, and racial disparities in, maternal mortality is critical for achieving health equity and reducing the innumerable costs associated with these outcomes (Crear‐Perry et al., 2020).Although a confluence of structural, social, and clinical factors can shape population‐level maternal mortality, it is apparent that racial disparities in these outcomes emerge from structural and social inequities rooted in structural racism—defined as the totality of ways in which society fosters racial discrimination through mutually reinforcing social, educational, economic, and health care systems and policies—that ultimately create and maintain racial disparities in maternal health (Bailey et al., 2017; Crear‐Perry http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Community Psychology Wiley

Complex systems and participatory approaches to address maternal health disparities: Findings from a system dynamics group model building project in North Texas

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References (32)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2023 Society for Community Research and Action
ISSN
0091-0562
eISSN
1573-2770
DOI
10.1002/ajcp.12636
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONIn the United States (US), maternal mortality is an urgent public health issue (Taylor, 2020). The US maternal mortality rate has steadily increased over the past 30 years (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019b), with nearly 60% of cases considered preventable (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019a). However, significant and persistent racial disparities in maternal mortality exist, as non‐Hispanic Black women (NHBW) experience mortality rates three times higher than their White counterparts—disparities that have remained nearly unchanged for over a decade (MacDorman et al., 2021). Further, these disparities persist even after controlling for factors such as socioeconomic status, health behaviors, and insurance coverage (Taylor, 2020). Ultimately, reducing the prevalence of, and racial disparities in, maternal mortality is critical for achieving health equity and reducing the innumerable costs associated with these outcomes (Crear‐Perry et al., 2020).Although a confluence of structural, social, and clinical factors can shape population‐level maternal mortality, it is apparent that racial disparities in these outcomes emerge from structural and social inequities rooted in structural racism—defined as the totality of ways in which society fosters racial discrimination through mutually reinforcing social, educational, economic, and health care systems and policies—that ultimately create and maintain racial disparities in maternal health (Bailey et al., 2017; Crear‐Perry

Journal

American Journal of Community PsychologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2023

Keywords: African American; complex systems; maternal health disparities; structural racism; system dynamics group model building; system dynamics modeling

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