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Corporal Punishment and Elevated Neural Response to Threat in Children

Corporal Punishment and Elevated Neural Response to Threat in Children Spanking remains common around the world, despite evidence linking corporal punishment to detrimental child outcomes. This study tested whether children (Mage = 11.60) who were spanked (N = 40) exhibited altered neural function in response to stimuli that suggest the presence of an environmental threat compared to children who were not spanked (N = 107). Children who were spanked exhibited greater activation in multiple regions of the medial and lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, dorsomedial PFC, bilateral frontal pole, and left middle frontal gyrus in response to fearful relative to neutral faces compared to children who were not spanked. These findings suggest that spanking may alter neural responses to environmental threats in a manner similar to more severe forms of maltreatment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Child Development Wiley

Corporal Punishment and Elevated Neural Response to Threat in Children

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References (64)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Child Development © 2021 The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
ISSN
0009-3920
eISSN
1467-8624
DOI
10.1111/cdev.13565
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spanking remains common around the world, despite evidence linking corporal punishment to detrimental child outcomes. This study tested whether children (Mage = 11.60) who were spanked (N = 40) exhibited altered neural function in response to stimuli that suggest the presence of an environmental threat compared to children who were not spanked (N = 107). Children who were spanked exhibited greater activation in multiple regions of the medial and lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, dorsomedial PFC, bilateral frontal pole, and left middle frontal gyrus in response to fearful relative to neutral faces compared to children who were not spanked. These findings suggest that spanking may alter neural responses to environmental threats in a manner similar to more severe forms of maltreatment.

Journal

Child DevelopmentWiley

Published: May 1, 2021

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