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Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture: Based on the Competing Values Framework

Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture: Based on the Competing Values Framework Kim S. Cameron and Robert E. Quinn . Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture: Based on the Competing Values Framework . San Francisco : Jossey‐Bass , 2005 , 242 pages, $40.00 softcover . Reviewed by Andrew Garman, Program Director, Department of Health Systems Management, Rush University, Chicago, IL. In the graduate course that I teach, I describe organizational culture as falling on a continuum somewhere between science and religion. Like a science, it often develops from experiences of what seems to predicate success; like a religion, it is also born of superstition, ritual, and a vague sense (faith?) that these patterns of conduct should certainly lead to payoff at some undefined future point in the journey. It turns out the analogy works surprisingly well in the applied side also: In cultural change efforts we often talk about whether someone has “gotten the religion;” if they have not we challenge them with scientific evidence that the old culture would not take us where we want to go. Although culture may contain elements of private science and collective religion, the gulf between the two is wide enough that most authors end up allying themselves to one or the other side. Most http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture: Based on the Competing Values Framework

Personnel Psychology , Volume 59 (3) – Sep 1, 2006

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References (4)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.2006.00052_5.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Kim S. Cameron and Robert E. Quinn . Diagnosing and Changing Organizational Culture: Based on the Competing Values Framework . San Francisco : Jossey‐Bass , 2005 , 242 pages, $40.00 softcover . Reviewed by Andrew Garman, Program Director, Department of Health Systems Management, Rush University, Chicago, IL. In the graduate course that I teach, I describe organizational culture as falling on a continuum somewhere between science and religion. Like a science, it often develops from experiences of what seems to predicate success; like a religion, it is also born of superstition, ritual, and a vague sense (faith?) that these patterns of conduct should certainly lead to payoff at some undefined future point in the journey. It turns out the analogy works surprisingly well in the applied side also: In cultural change efforts we often talk about whether someone has “gotten the religion;” if they have not we challenge them with scientific evidence that the old culture would not take us where we want to go. Although culture may contain elements of private science and collective religion, the gulf between the two is wide enough that most authors end up allying themselves to one or the other side. Most

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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