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Distribution of Fiddler Crabs in Georgia Salt Marshes

Distribution of Fiddler Crabs in Georgia Salt Marshes ECOLOGY VoL. 39 APRIL, 1958 Ko. 2 JOHN M. TEAL University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia INTRODUCTION the marsh and could easily move to an environ­ ment different from that chosen by the larvae. The study of the distribution of animals in nature is especially interesting when several spe­ Tr-rn SALT MARSH cies of one genus occupy the same general area. The Georgia salt marshes occupy a band about Along the east coast of the United States there eight kilometers wide, bordered by the land on one are three species of fiddler crabs of the genus U ca side and by the sea islands on the other. They which live in the salt marshes. All three are found are cut by a network of tidal rivers and creeks in the marshes surrounding Sapelo Island, (Fig. 1). Georgia, and this paper deals with experiments ' The salt marsh may be divided into the follow­ concerning their distribution in these marshes. ing types determined by the organisms present I deal with the problem of why the crabs live in (especially the species and forms of the vegeta­ certain habitats within their range and not in tion), the particle sizes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecology Wiley

Distribution of Fiddler Crabs in Georgia Salt Marshes

Ecology , Volume 39 (2) – Apr 1, 1958

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References (3)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Society for Community Research and Action
ISSN
0012-9658
eISSN
1939-9170
DOI
10.2307/1931862
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ECOLOGY VoL. 39 APRIL, 1958 Ko. 2 JOHN M. TEAL University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia INTRODUCTION the marsh and could easily move to an environ­ ment different from that chosen by the larvae. The study of the distribution of animals in nature is especially interesting when several spe­ Tr-rn SALT MARSH cies of one genus occupy the same general area. The Georgia salt marshes occupy a band about Along the east coast of the United States there eight kilometers wide, bordered by the land on one are three species of fiddler crabs of the genus U ca side and by the sea islands on the other. They which live in the salt marshes. All three are found are cut by a network of tidal rivers and creeks in the marshes surrounding Sapelo Island, (Fig. 1). Georgia, and this paper deals with experiments ' The salt marsh may be divided into the follow­ concerning their distribution in these marshes. ing types determined by the organisms present I deal with the problem of why the crabs live in (especially the species and forms of the vegeta­ certain habitats within their range and not in tion), the particle sizes

Journal

EcologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1958

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