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Ecology of Fire

Ecology of Fire REVIEWS Ecology, 65(1), 1984, pp. 333-334 © 1984 by the Ecological Society of America ably demonstrated by Miron Heinselman and Henry Wright. Mooney, H. A., T. M. Bonnicksen, N. L. Christensen, J. E. Heinselman utilized his own work and that of others on spa­ Lotan, and W. A. Reiners (Technical Coordinators). 1981. tio-temporal distributions of age classes of trees to develop Fire regimes and ecosystem properties. General Technical Re­ explicit hypotheses regarding how differences in the fire re­ port W0-26. United States Forest Service, Department of gimes have influenced the vegetation present in boreal and Agriculture, Washington, DC. vi + 594 p. (paper). alpine forests of North America. Wright used historical rec­ For years, the role of disturbance in ecological systems has ords of past fire frequency recorded in sediments, as well as been neglected. Succession, as an "orderly" process of de­ pollen and charcoal stratigraphy oflakes, to hypothesize how velopment of communities in the absence of disturbance, has forests around selected lakes have, over millenia, shifted be­ received far more attention than have the consequences of tween fire-resistent and fire-adapted states. In contrast to these communities being present in environments in which distur­ papers, C. S. Holling developed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecology Wiley

Ecology of Fire

Ecology , Volume 65 (1) – Feb 1, 1984

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"© Society for Community Research and Action"
ISSN
0012-9658
eISSN
1939-9170
DOI
10.2307/1939488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS Ecology, 65(1), 1984, pp. 333-334 © 1984 by the Ecological Society of America ably demonstrated by Miron Heinselman and Henry Wright. Mooney, H. A., T. M. Bonnicksen, N. L. Christensen, J. E. Heinselman utilized his own work and that of others on spa­ Lotan, and W. A. Reiners (Technical Coordinators). 1981. tio-temporal distributions of age classes of trees to develop Fire regimes and ecosystem properties. General Technical Re­ explicit hypotheses regarding how differences in the fire re­ port W0-26. United States Forest Service, Department of gimes have influenced the vegetation present in boreal and Agriculture, Washington, DC. vi + 594 p. (paper). alpine forests of North America. Wright used historical rec­ For years, the role of disturbance in ecological systems has ords of past fire frequency recorded in sediments, as well as been neglected. Succession, as an "orderly" process of de­ pollen and charcoal stratigraphy oflakes, to hypothesize how velopment of communities in the absence of disturbance, has forests around selected lakes have, over millenia, shifted be­ received far more attention than have the consequences of tween fire-resistent and fire-adapted states. In contrast to these communities being present in environments in which distur­ papers, C. S. Holling developed

Journal

EcologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1984

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