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Effect of acute hyperglycaemia on sensory processing in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

Effect of acute hyperglycaemia on sensory processing in diabetic autonomic neuropathy Eur J Clin Invest 2010; 40 (10): 883–886 Background Acute hyperglycaemia is known to increase gastrointestinal (GI) sensitivity in healthy subjects and may contribute to the increased prevalence of GI symptoms in diabetes patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute hyperglycaemia on perception and brain responses to painful visceral and somatic stimuli in diabetic patients. Materials and methods The sensitivity and evoked brain potentials (EPs) to electrical oesophageal and median nerve stimulations were assessed in 14 type‐1 diabetes patients with autonomic neuropathy and GI symptoms using a hyperinsulinaemic clamp at 6 and 15 mM. Results No differences between the normo‐ and hyperglycaemic conditions were found in sensitivity to both oesophageal (P = 0·72) and median nerve (P = 0·66) stimulations. The latencies and amplitudes of EPs did not differ between the normo‐ and hyperglycaemic conditions following oesophageal (P = 0·53 and 0·57) and median nerve (P = 0·78 and 0·52) stimulations. Conclusions Acute hyperglycaemia itself does not contribute to the sensations in patients with longstanding diabetes and autonomic neuropathy. Any potential sensory effects of acute hyperglycaemia can likely be blurred by the neuropathic‐like changes in the sensory nervous system. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Clinical Investigation Wiley

Effect of acute hyperglycaemia on sensory processing in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

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References (21)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation
ISSN
0014-2972
eISSN
1365-2362
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2362.2010.02335.x
pmid
20624170
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Eur J Clin Invest 2010; 40 (10): 883–886 Background Acute hyperglycaemia is known to increase gastrointestinal (GI) sensitivity in healthy subjects and may contribute to the increased prevalence of GI symptoms in diabetes patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute hyperglycaemia on perception and brain responses to painful visceral and somatic stimuli in diabetic patients. Materials and methods The sensitivity and evoked brain potentials (EPs) to electrical oesophageal and median nerve stimulations were assessed in 14 type‐1 diabetes patients with autonomic neuropathy and GI symptoms using a hyperinsulinaemic clamp at 6 and 15 mM. Results No differences between the normo‐ and hyperglycaemic conditions were found in sensitivity to both oesophageal (P = 0·72) and median nerve (P = 0·66) stimulations. The latencies and amplitudes of EPs did not differ between the normo‐ and hyperglycaemic conditions following oesophageal (P = 0·53 and 0·57) and median nerve (P = 0·78 and 0·52) stimulations. Conclusions Acute hyperglycaemia itself does not contribute to the sensations in patients with longstanding diabetes and autonomic neuropathy. Any potential sensory effects of acute hyperglycaemia can likely be blurred by the neuropathic‐like changes in the sensory nervous system.

Journal

European Journal of Clinical InvestigationWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2010

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