Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Embryogenesis of the damselfly Euphaea yayeyamana Oguma (Insecta: Odonata: Euphaeidae), with special reference to the formation of their larval abdominal “gill‐like” appendages

Embryogenesis of the damselfly Euphaea yayeyamana Oguma (Insecta: Odonata: Euphaeidae), with... The acquisition of wings in insects is the most significant subject in considering the diversification and adaptive radiation of insects, that is, the “macro‐evolution” of insects. In the discussion of the origin of insect wings, Palaeoptera has attracted particular attention in phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. In particular, Ephemeroptera have segmental gill‐structures on their abdominal segments during their nymphal stage, and these have been noted in discussions regarding their homology and/or serial homology between wings, gills and appendages. Although Odonata has received little attention in the course of these discussions, there are cases of segmental gill‐like structures on their abdomen in the two families, Euphaeidae and Polythoridae. Under such cirumstances, in this study, the embryological developmental process in Euphaea yayeyamana of Euphaeidae was observed, focusing on the formation process of the gill‐like structures. As a result, it was revealed that four of the seven pairs of gill‐like projection structures started their visible formation within the middle stages of embryonic development, and the remaining three pairs developed during the early stages of post‐embryogenesis. Some joint‐like structures existed in all of the gill‐like projections. It was revealed that muscle tissue was interposed within these protrusions and that all of the projections themselves fully articulated, and that the nervous system was extended into the protrusions. All of the gill‐like projections strongly suggested their homology with the cephalic and thoracic appendages, when we considered them with regard to their serial homology based on the topology of their formation position. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Entomological Science Wiley

Embryogenesis of the damselfly Euphaea yayeyamana Oguma (Insecta: Odonata: Euphaeidae), with special reference to the formation of their larval abdominal “gill‐like” appendages

Entomological Science , Volume 23 (3) – Sep 1, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/embryogenesis-of-the-damselfly-euphaea-yayeyamana-oguma-insecta-jlMa0JDerd

References (56)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2020 The Entomological Society of Japan
ISSN
1343-8786
eISSN
1479-8298
DOI
10.1111/ens.12421
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The acquisition of wings in insects is the most significant subject in considering the diversification and adaptive radiation of insects, that is, the “macro‐evolution” of insects. In the discussion of the origin of insect wings, Palaeoptera has attracted particular attention in phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. In particular, Ephemeroptera have segmental gill‐structures on their abdominal segments during their nymphal stage, and these have been noted in discussions regarding their homology and/or serial homology between wings, gills and appendages. Although Odonata has received little attention in the course of these discussions, there are cases of segmental gill‐like structures on their abdomen in the two families, Euphaeidae and Polythoridae. Under such cirumstances, in this study, the embryological developmental process in Euphaea yayeyamana of Euphaeidae was observed, focusing on the formation process of the gill‐like structures. As a result, it was revealed that four of the seven pairs of gill‐like projection structures started their visible formation within the middle stages of embryonic development, and the remaining three pairs developed during the early stages of post‐embryogenesis. Some joint‐like structures existed in all of the gill‐like projections. It was revealed that muscle tissue was interposed within these protrusions and that all of the projections themselves fully articulated, and that the nervous system was extended into the protrusions. All of the gill‐like projections strongly suggested their homology with the cephalic and thoracic appendages, when we considered them with regard to their serial homology based on the topology of their formation position.

Journal

Entomological ScienceWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2020

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

There are no references for this article.