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Employment patterns of long‐term cancer survivors

Employment patterns of long‐term cancer survivors As more people are diagnosed at earlier stages and surviving cancer, they are increasingly likely to be at working ages, where issues regarding productivity and employment continuation must be addressed by patients and employers alike. To this end, we studied the employment patterns of 253 long‐term cancer survivors in the Detroit Metropolitan Area. Of those working at the time of their initial diagnosis, 67% were employed 5–7 years later. Patients who stopped working did so because they retired (54%), were in poor health/disabled (24%), quit (4%), cited other reasons (9%), or their business closed (9%). Many employed patients worked in excess of 40 h per week although some reported various degrees of disability that interfered with job performance. Overall, the ability of cancer patients to continue employment appears optimistic. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psycho-Oncology Wiley

Employment patterns of long‐term cancer survivors

Psycho-Oncology , Volume 11 (3) – Jan 1, 2002

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References (23)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
1057-9249
eISSN
1099-1611
DOI
10.1002/pon.544
pmid
12112479
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As more people are diagnosed at earlier stages and surviving cancer, they are increasingly likely to be at working ages, where issues regarding productivity and employment continuation must be addressed by patients and employers alike. To this end, we studied the employment patterns of 253 long‐term cancer survivors in the Detroit Metropolitan Area. Of those working at the time of their initial diagnosis, 67% were employed 5–7 years later. Patients who stopped working did so because they retired (54%), were in poor health/disabled (24%), quit (4%), cited other reasons (9%), or their business closed (9%). Many employed patients worked in excess of 40 h per week although some reported various degrees of disability that interfered with job performance. Overall, the ability of cancer patients to continue employment appears optimistic. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Psycho-OncologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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