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Estimating plant biomass: A review of techniques

Estimating plant biomass: A review of techniques Abstract Many different techniques have been used to estimate biomass for ecological, agricultural and forestry research. The most suitable technique depends on available budget, accuracy required, structure and composition of the vegetation, and whether species and component biomass are required. A survey of the methods that have been used to estimate biomass is given, and the advantages and disadvantages of direct sampling, calibrated visual estimation and double sampling techniques are discussed. The relative cost and accuracy of each technique are summarized and recommendations are made for the use of the techniques in different vegetation complexes, such as discrete shrubs or trees, patchy vegetation, homogeneous vegetation, and species‐rich inhomogeneous heathland. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Austral Ecology Wiley

Estimating plant biomass: A review of techniques

Austral Ecology , Volume 17 (2) – Jun 1, 1992

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References (38)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1442-9985
eISSN
1442-9993
DOI
10.1111/j.1442-9993.1992.tb00790.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Many different techniques have been used to estimate biomass for ecological, agricultural and forestry research. The most suitable technique depends on available budget, accuracy required, structure and composition of the vegetation, and whether species and component biomass are required. A survey of the methods that have been used to estimate biomass is given, and the advantages and disadvantages of direct sampling, calibrated visual estimation and double sampling techniques are discussed. The relative cost and accuracy of each technique are summarized and recommendations are made for the use of the techniques in different vegetation complexes, such as discrete shrubs or trees, patchy vegetation, homogeneous vegetation, and species‐rich inhomogeneous heathland.

Journal

Austral EcologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1992

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