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Europe, the End of the West and Global Power Shifts

Europe, the End of the West and Global Power Shifts Relative economic, political, and military power is undoubtedly shifting away from the West, most notably to Asia, but also to other world regions. Moreover, non‐state actors and cross‐border flows increasingly pose challenges to Western states’ capacity for crisis management. Consequently, the liberal world order and its governance structures have come under pressure. Even more fundamental is the emerging challenge to the notion of the ‘West’ as a group of countries led by the United States and unified around core values and principles. The 2016 US election results raise serious doubts about the future US administration's resolve to abide by liberal democratic norms both internally and in their international relations. Whether deliberately or indirectly in the pursuit of other goals, the US may undermine the already weakened rules‐based international system and thereby accelerate the decline of the West's material and ideological hegemony. In light of these potential conflicts, European governments must take immediate action to prepare for a new global order. They must first strengthen their own countries and enhance the internal coherence of the Union. Second, they must improve the crisis management facilities and strategic capacities within their borders as well as within the euro area and the EU. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Policy Wiley

Europe, the End of the West and Global Power Shifts

Global Policy , Volume 8 – Jun 1, 2017

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References (13)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 University of Durham and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
ISSN
1758-5880
eISSN
1758-5899
DOI
10.1111/1758-5899.12437
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Relative economic, political, and military power is undoubtedly shifting away from the West, most notably to Asia, but also to other world regions. Moreover, non‐state actors and cross‐border flows increasingly pose challenges to Western states’ capacity for crisis management. Consequently, the liberal world order and its governance structures have come under pressure. Even more fundamental is the emerging challenge to the notion of the ‘West’ as a group of countries led by the United States and unified around core values and principles. The 2016 US election results raise serious doubts about the future US administration's resolve to abide by liberal democratic norms both internally and in their international relations. Whether deliberately or indirectly in the pursuit of other goals, the US may undermine the already weakened rules‐based international system and thereby accelerate the decline of the West's material and ideological hegemony. In light of these potential conflicts, European governments must take immediate action to prepare for a new global order. They must first strengthen their own countries and enhance the internal coherence of the Union. Second, they must improve the crisis management facilities and strategic capacities within their borders as well as within the euro area and the EU.

Journal

Global PolicyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2017

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