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EVOLUTION AND MEASUREMENT OF SPECIES DIVERSITY

EVOLUTION AND MEASUREMENT OF SPECIES DIVERSITY Given a resource gradient (e.g. light intensity, prey size) in a community, species evolve to use different parts of this gradient; competition between them is thereby reduced. Species relationships in the community may be conceived in terms of a multidimensional coordinate system, the axes of which are the various resource gradients (and other aspects of species relationships to space, time, and one another in the community). This coordinate system defines a hyperspace, and the range of the space that a given species occupies is its niche hypervolume, as an abstract characterization of its intra‐community position, or niche. Species evolve toward difference in niche, and consequently toward difference in location of their hypervolumes in the niche hyperspace. Through evolutionary time additional species can fit into the community in niche hypervolumes different from those of other species, and the niche hyperspace can become increasingly complex. Its complexity relates to the community's richness in species, its alpha diversity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Taxon Wiley

EVOLUTION AND MEASUREMENT OF SPECIES DIVERSITY

Taxon , Volume 21 (2-3) – May 1, 1972

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References (182)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© International Association for Plant Taxonomy (IAPT) all rights reserved
ISSN
0040-0262
eISSN
1996-8175
DOI
10.2307/1218190
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Given a resource gradient (e.g. light intensity, prey size) in a community, species evolve to use different parts of this gradient; competition between them is thereby reduced. Species relationships in the community may be conceived in terms of a multidimensional coordinate system, the axes of which are the various resource gradients (and other aspects of species relationships to space, time, and one another in the community). This coordinate system defines a hyperspace, and the range of the space that a given species occupies is its niche hypervolume, as an abstract characterization of its intra‐community position, or niche. Species evolve toward difference in niche, and consequently toward difference in location of their hypervolumes in the niche hyperspace. Through evolutionary time additional species can fit into the community in niche hypervolumes different from those of other species, and the niche hyperspace can become increasingly complex. Its complexity relates to the community's richness in species, its alpha diversity.

Journal

TaxonWiley

Published: May 1, 1972

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