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First breeding and hand rearing of the New Zealand lesser short‐tailed bat Mystacina tuberculata at Auckland Zoo

First breeding and hand rearing of the New Zealand lesser short‐tailed bat Mystacina tuberculata... Auckland Zoo maintains the only captive New Zealand lesser short‐tailed bats Mystacina tuberculata in the world. These animals came to the Zoo in 2007 following a wild translocation attempt managed by the New Zealand Department of Conservation. Affected by a disease of unknown origin which damaged their ear pinnae, the bats were considered unsuitable for release. The colony has provided an excellent opportunity to develop the husbandry protocols required for the management and successful reproduction of these bats at the Zoo. Our knowledge has increased significantly with the successful breeding and hand rearing of two pups. While parent rearing would be preferred for future breeding events, the experience has confirmed the ability to rear pups if intervention is ever required. The work being carried out at Auckland Zoo contributes to the national efforts to conserve these threatened mammals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

First breeding and hand rearing of the New Zealand lesser short‐tailed bat Mystacina tuberculata at Auckland Zoo

International Zoo Yearbook , Volume 50 (1) – Jan 1, 2016

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References (7)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 The Zoological Society of London
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/izy.12121
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Auckland Zoo maintains the only captive New Zealand lesser short‐tailed bats Mystacina tuberculata in the world. These animals came to the Zoo in 2007 following a wild translocation attempt managed by the New Zealand Department of Conservation. Affected by a disease of unknown origin which damaged their ear pinnae, the bats were considered unsuitable for release. The colony has provided an excellent opportunity to develop the husbandry protocols required for the management and successful reproduction of these bats at the Zoo. Our knowledge has increased significantly with the successful breeding and hand rearing of two pups. While parent rearing would be preferred for future breeding events, the experience has confirmed the ability to rear pups if intervention is ever required. The work being carried out at Auckland Zoo contributes to the national efforts to conserve these threatened mammals.

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2016

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