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Food intake and growth rate of Cassowary chicks Casuarius spp reared at Mendi, Southern Highland Papua New Guinea

Food intake and growth rate of Cassowary chicks Casuarius spp reared at Mendi, Southern Highland... 0The Zoological Society of London Food intake and growth rate of Cassowary chicks Casuarius spp reared at Mendi, Southern Highland Papua New Guinea BRIAN REID Science Directorate, Department of Conservation, PO Box 10420, Wellington, New Zealand At Mendi the chicks were accommodated on sawdust and wood shaving litter in a 15 x 10 m pen with a 2 m high mesh fence. This was blanketed with foliage and stress-related perimeter pacing did not occur. Food was provided at regular intervals five times a day from 0700 to 1800 hours in three troughs so that birds lower in the hierarchy could feed simultaneously with the others and obtain their share (see Table 3). All faeces were removed during each feeding period and the litter, which was replenished every three to four weeks, was raked over twice a day. This routine, performed to maintain hygiene and to reduce the likelihood of reinfection by tapeworms, also restricted the opportunities for hungry birds to reingest droppings on days when rations were light. Cassowaries, which are mainly frugivorous, probably have the most flaccid and least muscular stomach of all ratites. Whereas wood shavings ingested by young Darwin’s rheas Pterocnemia pennata became impacted in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

Food intake and growth rate of Cassowary chicks Casuarius spp reared at Mendi, Southern Highland Papua New Guinea

International Zoo Yearbook , Volume 26 (1) – Jan 1, 1987

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References (16)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1987 The Zoological Society of London
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1090.1987.tb03157.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

0The Zoological Society of London Food intake and growth rate of Cassowary chicks Casuarius spp reared at Mendi, Southern Highland Papua New Guinea BRIAN REID Science Directorate, Department of Conservation, PO Box 10420, Wellington, New Zealand At Mendi the chicks were accommodated on sawdust and wood shaving litter in a 15 x 10 m pen with a 2 m high mesh fence. This was blanketed with foliage and stress-related perimeter pacing did not occur. Food was provided at regular intervals five times a day from 0700 to 1800 hours in three troughs so that birds lower in the hierarchy could feed simultaneously with the others and obtain their share (see Table 3). All faeces were removed during each feeding period and the litter, which was replenished every three to four weeks, was raked over twice a day. This routine, performed to maintain hygiene and to reduce the likelihood of reinfection by tapeworms, also restricted the opportunities for hungry birds to reingest droppings on days when rations were light. Cassowaries, which are mainly frugivorous, probably have the most flaccid and least muscular stomach of all ratites. Whereas wood shavings ingested by young Darwin’s rheas Pterocnemia pennata became impacted in

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1987

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