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G. Stanley Hall and the boys' club: Conservative applications of recapitulation theory

G. Stanley Hall and the boys' club: Conservative applications of recapitulation theory To contemporaries the child study movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was of major importance, but few historians have paid it more than cursory attention. Where examined a t all, as in the writings of Merle Curti, Lawrence Cremin, Richard Hofstadter, Edward Krug, and Dorothy ROSS,child study has been seen primarily as a prelude to “progressive education,” a breakthrough in psychology which altered educators’ notions of children as passive, empty vessels in which to pour predigested facts.’ This interpretation has much to commend it, for Hall was clearly responsible for much of the ferment in educational circles around the turn of the century. His plea for teachers to respect the innate nature and needs of developing children became the clarion call for educators of all hues, while the child-centered school, with its open classrooms, flexible curricula, and lax discipline gave symbolic testimony-if not literal application-to Hall’s decisive influence on the “new education.” But Hall’s ideas exerted far greater influence than has heretofore been recognized, especially in reform endeavors on the periphery of formal education. To suggest just a few: various church groups-established churches and extra-institutional units like the YMCA’s and city missionaries-explicitly appropriated child study http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences Wiley

G. Stanley Hall and the boys' club: Conservative applications of recapitulation theory

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References (8)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-5061
eISSN
1520-6696
DOI
10.1002/1520-6696(197304)9:2<140::AID-JHBS2300090206>3.0.CO;2-W
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To contemporaries the child study movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was of major importance, but few historians have paid it more than cursory attention. Where examined a t all, as in the writings of Merle Curti, Lawrence Cremin, Richard Hofstadter, Edward Krug, and Dorothy ROSS,child study has been seen primarily as a prelude to “progressive education,” a breakthrough in psychology which altered educators’ notions of children as passive, empty vessels in which to pour predigested facts.’ This interpretation has much to commend it, for Hall was clearly responsible for much of the ferment in educational circles around the turn of the century. His plea for teachers to respect the innate nature and needs of developing children became the clarion call for educators of all hues, while the child-centered school, with its open classrooms, flexible curricula, and lax discipline gave symbolic testimony-if not literal application-to Hall’s decisive influence on the “new education.” But Hall’s ideas exerted far greater influence than has heretofore been recognized, especially in reform endeavors on the periphery of formal education. To suggest just a few: various church groups-established churches and extra-institutional units like the YMCA’s and city missionaries-explicitly appropriated child study

Journal

Journal of the History of the Behavioral SciencesWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1973

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