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Gender differences in the individual characteristics and life contexts of late‐middle‐aged and older problem drinkers

Gender differences in the individual characteristics and life contexts of late‐middle‐aged and... This study focuses on gender differences in the individual characteristics and life contexts of late‐life problem drinkers. Late‐middle‐aged women with drinking problems (n = 183) consumed less alcohol, had fewer drinking problems, and reported more recent onset of drinking problems than did their male counterparts (n = 476). They also used more psychoactive medications, were more depressed, and were less likely to seek alcohol treatment. Consistent with a gender role perspective on alcohol abuse, problem‐drinking women had more family‐related and fewer financial stressors than did problem‐drinking men. Contrary to expectation, however, problem‐drinking women reported more support from children, extended family members, and friends than did problem‐drinking men. Moreover, women who continued to have drinking problems over a 1‐year interval reported some unexpected short‐term benefits at follow‐up, including reduced spouse stressors. Women who had remitted at follow‐up experienced less spouse support, and more family‐related stressors and depression than did remitted men. They also lost support from extended family members over the 1‐year interval. The results suggest a need for screening and treatment efforts tailored more closely to the life circumstances of women with late‐life drinking problems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Addiction Wiley

Gender differences in the individual characteristics and life contexts of late‐middle‐aged and older problem drinkers

Addiction , Volume 88 (6) – Jun 1, 1993

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References (20)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0965-2140
eISSN
1360-0443
DOI
10.1111/j.1360-0443.1993.tb02092.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study focuses on gender differences in the individual characteristics and life contexts of late‐life problem drinkers. Late‐middle‐aged women with drinking problems (n = 183) consumed less alcohol, had fewer drinking problems, and reported more recent onset of drinking problems than did their male counterparts (n = 476). They also used more psychoactive medications, were more depressed, and were less likely to seek alcohol treatment. Consistent with a gender role perspective on alcohol abuse, problem‐drinking women had more family‐related and fewer financial stressors than did problem‐drinking men. Contrary to expectation, however, problem‐drinking women reported more support from children, extended family members, and friends than did problem‐drinking men. Moreover, women who continued to have drinking problems over a 1‐year interval reported some unexpected short‐term benefits at follow‐up, including reduced spouse stressors. Women who had remitted at follow‐up experienced less spouse support, and more family‐related stressors and depression than did remitted men. They also lost support from extended family members over the 1‐year interval. The results suggest a need for screening and treatment efforts tailored more closely to the life circumstances of women with late‐life drinking problems.

Journal

AddictionWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1993

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