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Going public: some thoughts on anthropology in and of the world

Going public: some thoughts on anthropology in and of the world A year ago, in June 2012, I attended the RAI conference on ‘Anthropology in the World’ at the British Museum. Its aim was, in RAI director David Shankland's words, to ‘explore and evaluate the position, role, and influence of anthropology outside academia’. There were 456 participants from 43 different countries, more than half of them not based at any British university. The organization had of course been particularly keen to attract anthropologists working outside academia. Not surprisingly, there were many younger colleagues among them. They used their creativity and enthusiasm to craft their own niche in the wider world. Thirty‐two panels presented a spectrum of different ways to engage with the world, ranging from diplomacy, education, security studies, museum work, and business to journalism, public health, law, tourism, and government. The keynote address was delivered by Gillian Tett, who entered the crowded BP Lecture Hall virtually, on a Cloud from New York City. This Cambridge anthropologist turned Financial Times journalist addressed the problems of remaining faithful to and proud of anthropology while doing journalism in high finance circles at a time when the arrogance and hubris of the financial sector still had no limits. She offered comfort and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute Wiley

Going public: some thoughts on anthropology in and of the world

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References (4)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2013 Royal Anthropological Institute
ISSN
1359-0987
eISSN
1467-9655
DOI
10.1111/1467-9655.12039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A year ago, in June 2012, I attended the RAI conference on ‘Anthropology in the World’ at the British Museum. Its aim was, in RAI director David Shankland's words, to ‘explore and evaluate the position, role, and influence of anthropology outside academia’. There were 456 participants from 43 different countries, more than half of them not based at any British university. The organization had of course been particularly keen to attract anthropologists working outside academia. Not surprisingly, there were many younger colleagues among them. They used their creativity and enthusiasm to craft their own niche in the wider world. Thirty‐two panels presented a spectrum of different ways to engage with the world, ranging from diplomacy, education, security studies, museum work, and business to journalism, public health, law, tourism, and government. The keynote address was delivered by Gillian Tett, who entered the crowded BP Lecture Hall virtually, on a Cloud from New York City. This Cambridge anthropologist turned Financial Times journalist addressed the problems of remaining faithful to and proud of anthropology while doing journalism in high finance circles at a time when the arrogance and hubris of the financial sector still had no limits. She offered comfort and

Journal

The Journal of the Royal Anthropological InstituteWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2013

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