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Good Care of Dying Patients: The Alternative to Physician‐Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia

Good Care of Dying Patients: The Alternative to Physician‐Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia A t the 1992 annual meeting of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS), an unusual gathering occurred. The AGS Ethics Committee had organized an open forum to allow members to discuss physician‐assisted dying (PAD), including physician‐assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia, a controversial topic receiving increasing attention in both the lay and professional media. What was so striking about the open forum was not so much what was said about PAD, but rather the consensus that PAD was, in a sense, the wrong thing to be talking about. Many of the annual meeting attendees came, and most of them contended that the priority should lie with improving the palliative care of dying patients. The sense of the meeting was that the interest in and demand for legalization of PAD would dramatically decline, if not nearly disappear, if the health care community did a better job of providing attentive and compassionate care to dying patients. In response to this open forum discussion, the AGS Ethics Committee undertook two activities. One was drafting a new position paper on good care of dying patients. This position paper was approved by the AGS Board of Directors at the annual meeting in May 1994 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Geriatrics Society Wiley

Good Care of Dying Patients: The Alternative to Physician‐Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia

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References (71)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1995 The American Geriatrics Society
ISSN
0002-8614
eISSN
1532-5415
DOI
10.1111/j.1532-5415.1995.tb06106.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A t the 1992 annual meeting of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS), an unusual gathering occurred. The AGS Ethics Committee had organized an open forum to allow members to discuss physician‐assisted dying (PAD), including physician‐assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia, a controversial topic receiving increasing attention in both the lay and professional media. What was so striking about the open forum was not so much what was said about PAD, but rather the consensus that PAD was, in a sense, the wrong thing to be talking about. Many of the annual meeting attendees came, and most of them contended that the priority should lie with improving the palliative care of dying patients. The sense of the meeting was that the interest in and demand for legalization of PAD would dramatically decline, if not nearly disappear, if the health care community did a better job of providing attentive and compassionate care to dying patients. In response to this open forum discussion, the AGS Ethics Committee undertook two activities. One was drafting a new position paper on good care of dying patients. This position paper was approved by the AGS Board of Directors at the annual meeting in May 1994

Journal

Journal of American Geriatrics SocietyWiley

Published: May 1, 1995

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