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How Economic Disadvantage Affects the Availability and Nature of Mentoring Relationships During the Transition to Adulthood

How Economic Disadvantage Affects the Availability and Nature of Mentoring Relationships During... Supportive nonparental adults, particularly nonfamilial adults, provide critical support during the transition to adulthood, opening doors to educational and career paths. This study examined whether economic disadvantage shapes access to these relationships. Results showed that low‐income adolescents had reduced access to naturally occurring mentors, and the relationships they did form tended to be close bonds with family and friends, rather than nonfamilial adults. Their mentors were more likely to focus on practical support, and less likely to serve as role models or provide career advice. These effects of socioeconomic status on natural mentoring relationships remained evident, even when accounting for youth race/ethnicity. Findings suggest that networks of support differ depending on a youth's socioeconomic context in ways that could perpetuate social and economic inequalities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Community Psychology Wiley

How Economic Disadvantage Affects the Availability and Nature of Mentoring Relationships During the Transition to Adulthood

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References (49)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Society for Community Research and Action
ISSN
0091-0562
eISSN
1573-2770
DOI
10.1002/ajcp.12228
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Supportive nonparental adults, particularly nonfamilial adults, provide critical support during the transition to adulthood, opening doors to educational and career paths. This study examined whether economic disadvantage shapes access to these relationships. Results showed that low‐income adolescents had reduced access to naturally occurring mentors, and the relationships they did form tended to be close bonds with family and friends, rather than nonfamilial adults. Their mentors were more likely to focus on practical support, and less likely to serve as role models or provide career advice. These effects of socioeconomic status on natural mentoring relationships remained evident, even when accounting for youth race/ethnicity. Findings suggest that networks of support differ depending on a youth's socioeconomic context in ways that could perpetuate social and economic inequalities.

Journal

American Journal of Community PsychologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

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