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Hypo‐Egoic Self‐Regulation: Exercising Self‐Control by Diminishing the Influence of the Self

Hypo‐Egoic Self‐Regulation: Exercising Self‐Control by Diminishing the Influence of the Self ABSTRACT Theory and research dealing with self‐regulation have focused primarily on instances of self‐regulation that involve high levels of self‐reflection and effortful self‐control. However, intentionally trying to control one's behavior sometimes reduces the likelihood of achieving one's goals. This article examines the process of hypo‐egoic self‐regulation in which people relinquish deliberate, conscious control over their own behavior so that they will respond more naturally, spontaneously, or automatically. An examination of spontaneously occurring hypo‐egoic states (such as flow, deindividuation, and transcendence) suggests that hypo‐egoic states are characterized by lowered self‐awareness and/or an increase in concrete and present‐focused self‐thoughts. In light of this, people may intentionally foster hypo‐egoism via two pathways—(a) taking steps to reduce the proportion of time that they are self‐aware (such as repeating a behavior until it is automatic or practicing meditation) or (b) increasing the concreteness of their self‐thoughts (such as inducing a concrete mindset or practicing mindfulness). In this way, people may deliberately choose to regulate hypo‐egoically when effortful control might be detrimental to their performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Personality Wiley

Hypo‐Egoic Self‐Regulation: Exercising Self‐Control by Diminishing the Influence of the Self

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References (60)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0022-3506
eISSN
1467-6494
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-6494.2006.00429.x
pmid
17083667
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Theory and research dealing with self‐regulation have focused primarily on instances of self‐regulation that involve high levels of self‐reflection and effortful self‐control. However, intentionally trying to control one's behavior sometimes reduces the likelihood of achieving one's goals. This article examines the process of hypo‐egoic self‐regulation in which people relinquish deliberate, conscious control over their own behavior so that they will respond more naturally, spontaneously, or automatically. An examination of spontaneously occurring hypo‐egoic states (such as flow, deindividuation, and transcendence) suggests that hypo‐egoic states are characterized by lowered self‐awareness and/or an increase in concrete and present‐focused self‐thoughts. In light of this, people may intentionally foster hypo‐egoism via two pathways—(a) taking steps to reduce the proportion of time that they are self‐aware (such as repeating a behavior until it is automatic or practicing meditation) or (b) increasing the concreteness of their self‐thoughts (such as inducing a concrete mindset or practicing mindfulness). In this way, people may deliberately choose to regulate hypo‐egoically when effortful control might be detrimental to their performance.

Journal

Journal of PersonalityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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