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IMPROVING INVENTORY EFFICIENCY: A CASE STUDY OF LEAF‐LITTER ANT DIVERSITY IN MADAGASCAR

IMPROVING INVENTORY EFFICIENCY: A CASE STUDY OF LEAF‐LITTER ANT DIVERSITY IN MADAGASCAR For most invertebrates, ecologists lack efficient inventory methods for assessing geographic patterns of species richness, complementarity (distinctness), and areas of endemism. I evaluated the efficiency of quantitative inventory methods developed for leaf‐litter ants in tropical rain forests in eastern Madagascar. The aim was to maximize the number of species captured per sampling effort in a systematic design subject to standard statistical analysis. I used species and complementarity accumulation curves to evaluate the efficiency of the inventory design based on all ant species sampled and based on four species‐rich genera that could potentially act as surrogates for estimating total ant diversity. I evaluated: (1) efficiencies of pitfall and Winkler sifting methods to capture leaf‐litter ant assemblages, (2) effects of sample size and spacing on completeness and ranking of species richness, (3) completeness of complementarity values, and (4) four species‐rich ant genera that could potentially act as surrogates for estimating total ant richness. Inventories were conducted at 15 sites along elevational gradients at four localities. I collected 117044 worker ants belonging to 381 species from pitfall and leaf‐litter samples. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Applications Wiley

IMPROVING INVENTORY EFFICIENCY: A CASE STUDY OF LEAF‐LITTER ANT DIVERSITY IN MADAGASCAR

Ecological Applications , Volume 9 (2) – Jan 1, 1999

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References (31)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Society for Community Research and Action
ISSN
1051-0761
eISSN
1939-5582
DOI
10.1890/1051-0761(1999)009[0714:IIEACS]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

For most invertebrates, ecologists lack efficient inventory methods for assessing geographic patterns of species richness, complementarity (distinctness), and areas of endemism. I evaluated the efficiency of quantitative inventory methods developed for leaf‐litter ants in tropical rain forests in eastern Madagascar. The aim was to maximize the number of species captured per sampling effort in a systematic design subject to standard statistical analysis. I used species and complementarity accumulation curves to evaluate the efficiency of the inventory design based on all ant species sampled and based on four species‐rich genera that could potentially act as surrogates for estimating total ant diversity. I evaluated: (1) efficiencies of pitfall and Winkler sifting methods to capture leaf‐litter ant assemblages, (2) effects of sample size and spacing on completeness and ranking of species richness, (3) completeness of complementarity values, and (4) four species‐rich ant genera that could potentially act as surrogates for estimating total ant richness. Inventories were conducted at 15 sites along elevational gradients at four localities. I collected 117044 worker ants belonging to 381 species from pitfall and leaf‐litter samples.

Journal

Ecological ApplicationsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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