Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Indoor particle dynamics

Indoor particle dynamics Abstract Airborne particulate matter is a diverse pollutant class whose excessive presence in indoor air contributes to an array of adverse health and material‐damage effects. Particles are classified according to their diameter into three size modes: ultrafine ( 0.1 μm), accumulation (0.1–2 µm), and coarse (= 2 µm). These modes have largely distinct sources and composition, and they exhibit different dynamic behaviors. The concept of mass conservation or material balance provides a foundation for quantitatively and mechanistically linking important outcome variables, such as concentrations and exposures, to the influencing input parameters. The factors governing indoor particle concentrations include direct emissions from indoor sources, ventilation supply from outdoor air, filtration, deposition onto indoor surfaces, and removal from indoor air by means of ventilation. In some circumstances, transport and transformation processes within indoor environments may also play an important role in influencing particle concentrations and consequences. Such processes include mixing, interzonal transport, resuspension, coagulation, and phase change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Indoor Air Wiley

Indoor particle dynamics

Indoor Air , Volume 14 – Aug 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/indoor-particle-dynamics-54Pi2Ve8PI

References (54)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0905-6947
eISSN
1600-0668
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0668.2004.00286.x
pmid
15330785
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Airborne particulate matter is a diverse pollutant class whose excessive presence in indoor air contributes to an array of adverse health and material‐damage effects. Particles are classified according to their diameter into three size modes: ultrafine ( 0.1 μm), accumulation (0.1–2 µm), and coarse (= 2 µm). These modes have largely distinct sources and composition, and they exhibit different dynamic behaviors. The concept of mass conservation or material balance provides a foundation for quantitatively and mechanistically linking important outcome variables, such as concentrations and exposures, to the influencing input parameters. The factors governing indoor particle concentrations include direct emissions from indoor sources, ventilation supply from outdoor air, filtration, deposition onto indoor surfaces, and removal from indoor air by means of ventilation. In some circumstances, transport and transformation processes within indoor environments may also play an important role in influencing particle concentrations and consequences. Such processes include mixing, interzonal transport, resuspension, coagulation, and phase change.

Journal

Indoor AirWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.