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Infectious aetiology of Hodgkin and non‐Hodgkin lymphomas: a review of the epidemiological evidence

Infectious aetiology of Hodgkin and non‐Hodgkin lymphomas: a review of the epidemiological evidence Abstract. Lymphomas constitute a heterogeneous group of malignant disorders with different clinical behaviours, pathological features and epidemiological characteristics. For some lymphoma subtypes, epidemiological evidence has long pointed to infectious aetiologies. A subset of Hodgkin lymphoma is strongly linked to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. In addition, infectious agents can directly infect and transform lymphocytes (e.g. EBV, human herpesvirus 8), induce immunosuppression (human immunodeficiency virus), or cause chronic immune stimulation (hepatitis C virus, Helicobacter pylori), all of which may play a role in the development of various non‐Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes. Here, we review the epidemiological evidence linking infections with malignant lymphoma. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Internal Medicine Wiley

Infectious aetiology of Hodgkin and non‐Hodgkin lymphomas: a review of the epidemiological evidence

Journal of Internal Medicine , Volume 264 (6) – Dec 1, 2008

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References (71)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0954-6820
eISSN
1365-2796
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2796.2008.02031.x
pmid
19017178
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Lymphomas constitute a heterogeneous group of malignant disorders with different clinical behaviours, pathological features and epidemiological characteristics. For some lymphoma subtypes, epidemiological evidence has long pointed to infectious aetiologies. A subset of Hodgkin lymphoma is strongly linked to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. In addition, infectious agents can directly infect and transform lymphocytes (e.g. EBV, human herpesvirus 8), induce immunosuppression (human immunodeficiency virus), or cause chronic immune stimulation (hepatitis C virus, Helicobacter pylori), all of which may play a role in the development of various non‐Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes. Here, we review the epidemiological evidence linking infections with malignant lymphoma.

Journal

Journal of Internal MedicineWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2008

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