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Influence of temperature and photoperiod on embryonic development in the dragonfly Sympetrum striolatum (Odonata: Libellulidae)

Influence of temperature and photoperiod on embryonic development in the dragonfly Sympetrum... Temperature and photoperiod play major roles in insect ecology. Many insect species have fixed degree‐days for embryogenesis, with minimum and maximum temperature thresholds for egg and larval development and hatching. Often, photoperiodic changes trigger the transfer into the next life‐cycle stadium. However, it is not known whether this distinct pattern also exist in a species with a high level of phenotypic plasticity in life‐history traits. In the present study, eggs of the dragonfly Sympetrum striolatum Charpentier (Odonata: Libellulidae) are reared under different constant and fluctuating temperatures and photoperiodic conditions in several laboratory and field experiments. In general, and as expected, higher temperatures cause faster egg development. However, no general temperature or light‐days for eyespot development and hatching are found. The minimum temperature thresholds are distinguished for survival (2 °C), embryogenesis (6 °C) and larval hatching (above 6 °C). Low winter temperatures synchronize hatching. Above 36 °C, no eyespots are visible and no larvae hatch. In laboratory experiments, light is neither necessary for eyespot development, nor for hatching. By contrast to the laboratory experiments, the field experiment show that naturally changing temperature and photoperiod play a significant role in the seasonal regulation of embryonic development. The post‐eyespot development is more variable and influenced by temperature and photoperiod than the pre‐eyespot development. This developmental plasticity at the end of the embryogenesis might be a general pattern in the Libellulidae, helping them to cope with variation in environmental conditions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physiological Entomology Wiley

Influence of temperature and photoperiod on embryonic development in the dragonfly Sympetrum striolatum (Odonata: Libellulidae)

Physiological Entomology , Volume 40 (1) – Mar 1, 2015

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References (71)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"© 2015 The Royal Entomological Society"
ISSN
0307-6962
eISSN
1365-3032
DOI
10.1111/phen.12091
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Temperature and photoperiod play major roles in insect ecology. Many insect species have fixed degree‐days for embryogenesis, with minimum and maximum temperature thresholds for egg and larval development and hatching. Often, photoperiodic changes trigger the transfer into the next life‐cycle stadium. However, it is not known whether this distinct pattern also exist in a species with a high level of phenotypic plasticity in life‐history traits. In the present study, eggs of the dragonfly Sympetrum striolatum Charpentier (Odonata: Libellulidae) are reared under different constant and fluctuating temperatures and photoperiodic conditions in several laboratory and field experiments. In general, and as expected, higher temperatures cause faster egg development. However, no general temperature or light‐days for eyespot development and hatching are found. The minimum temperature thresholds are distinguished for survival (2 °C), embryogenesis (6 °C) and larval hatching (above 6 °C). Low winter temperatures synchronize hatching. Above 36 °C, no eyespots are visible and no larvae hatch. In laboratory experiments, light is neither necessary for eyespot development, nor for hatching. By contrast to the laboratory experiments, the field experiment show that naturally changing temperature and photoperiod play a significant role in the seasonal regulation of embryonic development. The post‐eyespot development is more variable and influenced by temperature and photoperiod than the pre‐eyespot development. This developmental plasticity at the end of the embryogenesis might be a general pattern in the Libellulidae, helping them to cope with variation in environmental conditions.

Journal

Physiological EntomologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2015

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