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Influenza in patients with hematological malignancies: Experience at two comprehensive cancer centers

Influenza in patients with hematological malignancies: Experience at two comprehensive cancer... BACKGROUNDInfluenza vaccine uptake and circulating virus strain play a major role in determining outcomes of influenza infection in the general population. However, in cancer patients, such as those with hematological malignancies (HMs) and recipients of hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs), many additional factors determine the severity of influenza infection, such as the underlying malignancy, immunosuppression, delay in presentation, and timing of antiviral therapy. Influenza infections are more likely to progress from upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) to lower respiratory tract infections (LRIs) with subsequent bacterial co‐infections in these patients than in the general population. Also, immunocompromised patients experience persistent viral shedding, need hospitalization and mechanical ventilation, and have high mortality rates following acquisition of influenza infections. Researchers have shown that delay from onset of influenza symptoms to seeking medical care and initiation of antiviral therapy is correlated with poor outcomes, mainly in HCT recipients.Influenza is increasingly recognized as a serious infection with fatal consequences in patients with HMs. However, only few studies focusing on influenza in cancer patients have been published. Most of these published studies included few patients with influenza during the H1N1 pandemic in the 2009 and 2010 influenza seasons, and few of them described the clinical presentations, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medical Virology Wiley

Influenza in patients with hematological malignancies: Experience at two comprehensive cancer centers

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References (27)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0146-6615
eISSN
1096-9071
DOI
10.1002/jmv.24930
pmid
28851056
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUNDInfluenza vaccine uptake and circulating virus strain play a major role in determining outcomes of influenza infection in the general population. However, in cancer patients, such as those with hematological malignancies (HMs) and recipients of hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs), many additional factors determine the severity of influenza infection, such as the underlying malignancy, immunosuppression, delay in presentation, and timing of antiviral therapy. Influenza infections are more likely to progress from upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) to lower respiratory tract infections (LRIs) with subsequent bacterial co‐infections in these patients than in the general population. Also, immunocompromised patients experience persistent viral shedding, need hospitalization and mechanical ventilation, and have high mortality rates following acquisition of influenza infections. Researchers have shown that delay from onset of influenza symptoms to seeking medical care and initiation of antiviral therapy is correlated with poor outcomes, mainly in HCT recipients.Influenza is increasingly recognized as a serious infection with fatal consequences in patients with HMs. However, only few studies focusing on influenza in cancer patients have been published. Most of these published studies included few patients with influenza during the H1N1 pandemic in the 2009 and 2010 influenza seasons, and few of them described the clinical presentations,

Journal

Journal of Medical VirologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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