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Intensive demographic and genetic management through European Endangered Species Programmes (EEPs) can make a difference: Cherry‐crowned mangabey Cercocebus torquatus European studbook and White‐naped mangabey Cercocebus atys lunulatus EEP results

Intensive demographic and genetic management through European Endangered Species Programmes... Many species of wildlife are threatened by destruction of their natural habitat and overhunting. Breeding programmes at zoological facilities can be used to prevent the extinction of some of these species, while contributing to the maintenance of an ex situ gene pool. Two species of primates of the family Cercopithecidae, the Cherry‐crowned mangabey Cercocebus torquatus and the White‐naped mangabey Cercocebus atys lunulatus, are at risk of disappearing in their natural habitat. Populations of both species are maintained at European zoos and have been managed as European studbooks since 1994. In the case of C. a. lunulatus, a European Endangered Species Programme (EEP) was established in 2000 to provide more intensive management. A series of demographic and genetic analyses have been carried out for both European populations using data as at the end of 2012. The results of the present study show that both populations are growing slowly. However, the Cherry‐crowned mangabey population shows high inbreeding and low genetic diversity, while the White‐naped mangabey population has better genetic health that could retain 90% of genetic diversity over the next 100 years, which is one of the main goals of breeding programmes carried out by zoological facilities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

Intensive demographic and genetic management through European Endangered Species Programmes (EEPs) can make a difference: Cherry‐crowned mangabey Cercocebus torquatus European studbook and White‐naped mangabey Cercocebus atys lunulatus EEP results

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References (11)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 The Zoological Society of London
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/izy.12125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many species of wildlife are threatened by destruction of their natural habitat and overhunting. Breeding programmes at zoological facilities can be used to prevent the extinction of some of these species, while contributing to the maintenance of an ex situ gene pool. Two species of primates of the family Cercopithecidae, the Cherry‐crowned mangabey Cercocebus torquatus and the White‐naped mangabey Cercocebus atys lunulatus, are at risk of disappearing in their natural habitat. Populations of both species are maintained at European zoos and have been managed as European studbooks since 1994. In the case of C. a. lunulatus, a European Endangered Species Programme (EEP) was established in 2000 to provide more intensive management. A series of demographic and genetic analyses have been carried out for both European populations using data as at the end of 2012. The results of the present study show that both populations are growing slowly. However, the Cherry‐crowned mangabey population shows high inbreeding and low genetic diversity, while the White‐naped mangabey population has better genetic health that could retain 90% of genetic diversity over the next 100 years, which is one of the main goals of breeding programmes carried out by zoological facilities.

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2016

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