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Intraosseous Sacral Myxopapillary Ependymoma and the Differential Diagnosis of Sacral Tumors

Intraosseous Sacral Myxopapillary Ependymoma and the Differential Diagnosis of Sacral Tumors ABSTRACT Although involvement of other regions of the spinal cord and brain stem is seen, myxopapillary ependymoma is most commonly found at the filum terminale or cauda equina. Less commonly, myxopapillary ependymoma may occur outside the central nervous system from direct metastatic extension of an intrathecal tumor, and rarely it may present as a primary tumor outside the thecal sac. The authors present a case of primary sacral myxopapillary ependymoma, which was first diagnosed as a chordoma. They then discuss the magnetic resonance imaging findings of this and other sacral tumors. Myxopapillary ependymoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a primary expansile sacral mass along with other lesions such as chordoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, and giant cell tumor. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neuroimaging Wiley

Intraosseous Sacral Myxopapillary Ependymoma and the Differential Diagnosis of Sacral Tumors

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References (15)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1051-2284
eISSN
1552-6569
DOI
10.1111/j.1552-6569.2001.tb00058.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Although involvement of other regions of the spinal cord and brain stem is seen, myxopapillary ependymoma is most commonly found at the filum terminale or cauda equina. Less commonly, myxopapillary ependymoma may occur outside the central nervous system from direct metastatic extension of an intrathecal tumor, and rarely it may present as a primary tumor outside the thecal sac. The authors present a case of primary sacral myxopapillary ependymoma, which was first diagnosed as a chordoma. They then discuss the magnetic resonance imaging findings of this and other sacral tumors. Myxopapillary ependymoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a primary expansile sacral mass along with other lesions such as chordoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, and giant cell tumor.

Journal

Journal of NeuroimagingWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2001

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