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IOM Report: Improving Medical Education—Enhancing the Behavioral and Social Science Content of Medical School Curricula

IOM Report: Improving Medical Education—Enhancing the Behavioral and Social Science Content of... portion of the population aged 65 and over is expected to grow by 57 percent by 2030, and with Americans now having an average life expectancy of 77 years, physicians need the knowledge and skills to care for this aging population. To this end, they must understand the interplay of social and behavioral factors (e.g., diet, exercise, and familial and social support) and the role these factors play in delaying or preventing the onset of disease and slowing its progression. A second demographic change is the rising percentage of minorities in the overall U.S. population. According to U.S. census data, 26 percent of the current population is nonwhite, a percentage that is expected to increase to almost 47 percent by 2050. The country’s growing cultural and ethnic diversity presents new challenges and opportunities for physicians and other health professionals, who must become culturally competent and better skilled in communicating and negotiating health management with diverse populations. The Committee on Behavioral and Social Sciences in Medical School Curricula was convened by the Institute of Medicine to provide the National Institutes of Health and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation with a critical analysis of the behavioral and social sciences in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Academic Emergency Medicine Wiley

IOM Report: Improving Medical Education—Enhancing the Behavioral and Social Science Content of Medical School Curricula

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Academic Emergency Medicine , Volume 13 (2) – Feb 1, 2006

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References (419)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2006 Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
ISSN
1069-6563
eISSN
1553-2712
DOI
10.1197/j.aem.2005.07.009
pmid
16436786
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

portion of the population aged 65 and over is expected to grow by 57 percent by 2030, and with Americans now having an average life expectancy of 77 years, physicians need the knowledge and skills to care for this aging population. To this end, they must understand the interplay of social and behavioral factors (e.g., diet, exercise, and familial and social support) and the role these factors play in delaying or preventing the onset of disease and slowing its progression. A second demographic change is the rising percentage of minorities in the overall U.S. population. According to U.S. census data, 26 percent of the current population is nonwhite, a percentage that is expected to increase to almost 47 percent by 2050. The country’s growing cultural and ethnic diversity presents new challenges and opportunities for physicians and other health professionals, who must become culturally competent and better skilled in communicating and negotiating health management with diverse populations. The Committee on Behavioral and Social Sciences in Medical School Curricula was convened by the Institute of Medicine to provide the National Institutes of Health and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation with a critical analysis of the behavioral and social sciences in

Journal

Academic Emergency MedicineWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2006

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