Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Is Income Inequality a Determinant of Population Health? Part 2. U.S. National and Regional Trends in Income Inequality and Age‐ and Cause‐Specific Mortality

Is Income Inequality a Determinant of Population Health? Part 2. U.S. National and Regional... This article describes U.S. income inequality and 100‐year national and 30‐year regional trends in age‐ and cause‐specific mortality. There is little congruence between national trends in income inequality and age‐ or cause‐specific mortality except perhaps for suicide and homicide. The variable trends in some causes of mortality may be associated regionally with income inequality. However, between 1978 and 2000 those regions experiencing the largest increases in income inequality had the largest declines in mortality (r= 0.81, p < 0.001). Understanding the social determinants of population health requires appreciating how broad indicators of social and economic conditions are related, at different times and places, to the levels and social distribution of major risk factors for particular health outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Milbank Quarterly Wiley

Is Income Inequality a Determinant of Population Health? Part 2. U.S. National and Regional Trends in Income Inequality and Age‐ and Cause‐Specific Mortality

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/is-income-inequality-a-determinant-of-population-health-part-2-u-s-eFR0t2GST0

References (118)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0887-378X
eISSN
1468-0009
DOI
10.1111/j.0887-378X.2004.00312.x
pmid
15225332
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article describes U.S. income inequality and 100‐year national and 30‐year regional trends in age‐ and cause‐specific mortality. There is little congruence between national trends in income inequality and age‐ or cause‐specific mortality except perhaps for suicide and homicide. The variable trends in some causes of mortality may be associated regionally with income inequality. However, between 1978 and 2000 those regions experiencing the largest increases in income inequality had the largest declines in mortality (r= 0.81, p < 0.001). Understanding the social determinants of population health requires appreciating how broad indicators of social and economic conditions are related, at different times and places, to the levels and social distribution of major risk factors for particular health outcomes.

Journal

The Milbank QuarterlyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.