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MEASURING NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN FORESTS: CONCEPTS AND FIELD METHODS

MEASURING NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN FORESTS: CONCEPTS AND FIELD METHODS There are pressing reasons for developing a better understanding of net primary production (NPP) in the world's forests. These ecosystems play a large role in the world's carbon budget, and their dynamics, which are likely to be responding to global changes in climate and atmospheric composition, have major economic implications and impacts on global biodiversity. Although there is a long history of forest NPP studies in the ecological literature, current understanding of ecosystem‐level production remains limited. Forest NPP cannot be directly measured; it must be approached by indirect methods. To date, field measurements have been largely restricted to a few aspects of NPP; methods are still lacking for field assessment of others, and past studies have involved confusion about the types of measurements needed. As a result, existing field‐based estimates of forest NPP are likely to be significant underestimates. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Applications Wiley

MEASURING NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN FORESTS: CONCEPTS AND FIELD METHODS

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References (107)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Society for Community Research and Action
ISSN
1051-0761
eISSN
1939-5582
DOI
10.1890/1051-0761(2001)011[0356:MNPPIF]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There are pressing reasons for developing a better understanding of net primary production (NPP) in the world's forests. These ecosystems play a large role in the world's carbon budget, and their dynamics, which are likely to be responding to global changes in climate and atmospheric composition, have major economic implications and impacts on global biodiversity. Although there is a long history of forest NPP studies in the ecological literature, current understanding of ecosystem‐level production remains limited. Forest NPP cannot be directly measured; it must be approached by indirect methods. To date, field measurements have been largely restricted to a few aspects of NPP; methods are still lacking for field assessment of others, and past studies have involved confusion about the types of measurements needed. As a result, existing field‐based estimates of forest NPP are likely to be significant underestimates.

Journal

Ecological ApplicationsWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2001

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

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