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Medical follow‐up visits in adults 5–25 years after treatment for childhood acute leukaemia, lymphoma or Wilms’ tumour

Medical follow‐up visits in adults 5–25 years after treatment for childhood acute leukaemia,... Aim: One aspect of organizing medical follow‐up for adult survivors of childhood cancer is to determine to what extent the former patient experiences a need for health services. In the present paper, we studied how the healthcare needs, both subjectively and objectively, were fulfilled for our former patients. Methods: 335 survivors over 18 y of age, with a follow‐up time of more than 5 y after completion of therapy, were sent a questionnaire probing their present use of health services. Results: The response rate was 73%. A majority (60%) of the survivors had no regular follow‐up visits, and 42% of these reported that they missed not having one. More than one third were thus far dissatisfied with the follow‐up programme. Only 3% of those who had regular follow‐ups found them “unnecessary”. Complaints subjectively related to their diseases or treatments were reported by 47%. Out of all responders, 34% did not miss having regular follow‐up visits. Neither perceived disease‐related complaints nor radiation therapy was a predictor for having a scheduled follow‐up visit. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Paediatrica: Nurturing The Child Wiley

Medical follow‐up visits in adults 5–25 years after treatment for childhood acute leukaemia, lymphoma or Wilms’ tumour

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References (26)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0803-5253
eISSN
1651-2227
DOI
10.1080/08035250600752441
pmid
16882563
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aim: One aspect of organizing medical follow‐up for adult survivors of childhood cancer is to determine to what extent the former patient experiences a need for health services. In the present paper, we studied how the healthcare needs, both subjectively and objectively, were fulfilled for our former patients. Methods: 335 survivors over 18 y of age, with a follow‐up time of more than 5 y after completion of therapy, were sent a questionnaire probing their present use of health services. Results: The response rate was 73%. A majority (60%) of the survivors had no regular follow‐up visits, and 42% of these reported that they missed not having one. More than one third were thus far dissatisfied with the follow‐up programme. Only 3% of those who had regular follow‐ups found them “unnecessary”. Complaints subjectively related to their diseases or treatments were reported by 47%. Out of all responders, 34% did not miss having regular follow‐up visits. Neither perceived disease‐related complaints nor radiation therapy was a predictor for having a scheduled follow‐up visit.

Journal

Acta Paediatrica: Nurturing The ChildWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2006

Keywords: ; ; ;

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