Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Metabolic model for glycogen‐accumulating organisms in anaerobic/aerobic activated sludge systems

Metabolic model for glycogen‐accumulating organisms in anaerobic/aerobic activated sludge systems Glycogen‐accumulating organisms (GAO) have the potential to directly compete with polyphosphate‐accumulating organisms (PAO) in EBPR systems as both are able to take up VFA anaerobically and grow on the intracellular storage products aerobically. Under anaerobic conditions GAO hydrolyse glycogen to gain energy and reducing equivalents to take up VFA and to synthesise polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). In the subsequent aerobic stage, PHA is being oxidised to gain energy for glycogen replenishment (from PHA) and for cell growth. This article describes a complete anaerobic and aerobic model for GAO based on the understanding of their metabolic pathways. The anaerobic model has been developed and reported previously, while the aerobic metabolic model was developed in this study. It is based on the assumption that acetyl‐CoA and propionyl‐CoA go through the catabolic and anabolic processes independently. Experimental validation shows that the integrated model can predict the anaerobic and aerobic results very well. It was found in this study that at pH 7 the maximum acetate uptake rate of GAO was slower than that reported for PAO in the anaerobic stage. On the other hand, the net biomass production per C‐mol acetate added is about 9% higher for GAO than for PAO. This would indicate that PAO and GAO each have certain competitive advantages during different parts of the anaerobic/aerobic process cycle. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 81: 92–105, 2003. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biotechnology and Bioengineering Wiley

Metabolic model for glycogen‐accumulating organisms in anaerobic/aerobic activated sludge systems

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/metabolic-model-for-glycogen-accumulating-organisms-in-anaerobic-LDW4ZvHik4

References (28)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0006-3592
eISSN
1097-0290
DOI
10.1002/bit.10455
pmid
12432585
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Glycogen‐accumulating organisms (GAO) have the potential to directly compete with polyphosphate‐accumulating organisms (PAO) in EBPR systems as both are able to take up VFA anaerobically and grow on the intracellular storage products aerobically. Under anaerobic conditions GAO hydrolyse glycogen to gain energy and reducing equivalents to take up VFA and to synthesise polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). In the subsequent aerobic stage, PHA is being oxidised to gain energy for glycogen replenishment (from PHA) and for cell growth. This article describes a complete anaerobic and aerobic model for GAO based on the understanding of their metabolic pathways. The anaerobic model has been developed and reported previously, while the aerobic metabolic model was developed in this study. It is based on the assumption that acetyl‐CoA and propionyl‐CoA go through the catabolic and anabolic processes independently. Experimental validation shows that the integrated model can predict the anaerobic and aerobic results very well. It was found in this study that at pH 7 the maximum acetate uptake rate of GAO was slower than that reported for PAO in the anaerobic stage. On the other hand, the net biomass production per C‐mol acetate added is about 9% higher for GAO than for PAO. This would indicate that PAO and GAO each have certain competitive advantages during different parts of the anaerobic/aerobic process cycle. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 81: 92–105, 2003.

Journal

Biotechnology and BioengineeringWiley

Published: Jan 5, 2003

Keywords: glycogen accumulating organism (GAO); EBPR; metabolic model; TOGA; stoichiometry; growth yield

There are no references for this article.