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Microarrays ‐ The Challenge of Preparing Brain Tissue Samples

Microarrays ‐ The Challenge of Preparing Brain Tissue Samples Microarray experiments allow researchers to collect an amazing amount of gene expression data that have the potential to provide unique information to help interpretation of the biological functions of the central nervous system. These experiments are, however, technically demanding and present unique difficulties when used in the context of neuroscience research, in particular. Success or failure of microarray experiments are highly dependent on reproducible target preparations. This involves a relatively long chain of preparation steps, such as removal of tissue from experimental animals or from post‐mortem human brains, storage, selection, and excision of brain regions. This is followed by RNA extraction, reverse transcription, and labeling of target cDNAs or cRNAs. Additionally, it is emphasized that the quality of microarray data largely relies on the proper handling of animals throughout experiments and the time of the day when experiments are stopped. This article tries to provide hints for some basic rules to be observed in preparation of samples for expression profiling studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Addiction Biology Wiley

Microarrays ‐ The Challenge of Preparing Brain Tissue Samples

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References (85)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1355-6215
eISSN
1369-1600
DOI
10.1080/13556210412331327803
pmid
15849014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Microarray experiments allow researchers to collect an amazing amount of gene expression data that have the potential to provide unique information to help interpretation of the biological functions of the central nervous system. These experiments are, however, technically demanding and present unique difficulties when used in the context of neuroscience research, in particular. Success or failure of microarray experiments are highly dependent on reproducible target preparations. This involves a relatively long chain of preparation steps, such as removal of tissue from experimental animals or from post‐mortem human brains, storage, selection, and excision of brain regions. This is followed by RNA extraction, reverse transcription, and labeling of target cDNAs or cRNAs. Additionally, it is emphasized that the quality of microarray data largely relies on the proper handling of animals throughout experiments and the time of the day when experiments are stopped. This article tries to provide hints for some basic rules to be observed in preparation of samples for expression profiling studies.

Journal

Addiction BiologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2005

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