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Myxopapillary ependymoma. A clinicopathologic and immunocytochemical study of 77 cases

Myxopapillary ependymoma. A clinicopathologic and immunocytochemical study of 77 cases The study involved 77 myxopapillary ependymomas of the spinal cord encountered during a 60‐year period (1924–1983). This variant of ependymoma was, with few exceptions, limited to the lumbosacral region, particularly the filum terminale. The male:female ratio was 1.7:1, and the mean age at diagnosis was 36.4 years (range, 6–82); at presentation, 15 (19%) of the patients were in the first two decades of life. The duration of symptoms ranged from 1 month to 30 years; the most frequent complaint was low‐back pain, and eight patients had undergone prior “disc surgery.” Generally, myelographic block was disclosed. Preoperative cerebrospinal fluid protein levels averaged 2462 mg/dl. Myxopapillary ependymomas are slow‐growing tumors that show no significant tendency to histologic dedifferentiation. Despite some variation in cytologic features and the presence of atypia and modest mitotic activity in most cases, the gross characteristics of the tumors appear to be of greater prognostic significance than the histologic features. Tumors that were encapsulated (25%) and amenable to intact, total surgical removal had a recurrence rate of 10%, whereas those that were removed either piecemeal (34%) or subtotally (41%) had recurrence rates of 19%. Overall survival, however, was more closely related to residual disease; total removal of tumor, whether intact (encapsulated) or piecemeal, resulted in longer survival (19 years) than did subtotal resection (14 years). Patients who died (6.5%) did so after a prolonged course marked by multiple recurrences. Radiotherapy may be of particular benefit to patients whose tumors are not amenable to intact total removal. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Wiley

Myxopapillary ependymoma. A clinicopathologic and immunocytochemical study of 77 cases

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References (72)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Cancer Society
ISSN
0008-543X
eISSN
1097-0142
DOI
10.1002/1097-0142(19850815)56:4<883::AID-CNCR2820560431>3.0.CO;2-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The study involved 77 myxopapillary ependymomas of the spinal cord encountered during a 60‐year period (1924–1983). This variant of ependymoma was, with few exceptions, limited to the lumbosacral region, particularly the filum terminale. The male:female ratio was 1.7:1, and the mean age at diagnosis was 36.4 years (range, 6–82); at presentation, 15 (19%) of the patients were in the first two decades of life. The duration of symptoms ranged from 1 month to 30 years; the most frequent complaint was low‐back pain, and eight patients had undergone prior “disc surgery.” Generally, myelographic block was disclosed. Preoperative cerebrospinal fluid protein levels averaged 2462 mg/dl. Myxopapillary ependymomas are slow‐growing tumors that show no significant tendency to histologic dedifferentiation. Despite some variation in cytologic features and the presence of atypia and modest mitotic activity in most cases, the gross characteristics of the tumors appear to be of greater prognostic significance than the histologic features. Tumors that were encapsulated (25%) and amenable to intact, total surgical removal had a recurrence rate of 10%, whereas those that were removed either piecemeal (34%) or subtotally (41%) had recurrence rates of 19%. Overall survival, however, was more closely related to residual disease; total removal of tumor, whether intact (encapsulated) or piecemeal, resulted in longer survival (19 years) than did subtotal resection (14 years). Patients who died (6.5%) did so after a prolonged course marked by multiple recurrences. Radiotherapy may be of particular benefit to patients whose tumors are not amenable to intact total removal.

Journal

CancerWiley

Published: Aug 15, 1985

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