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Nasal nitric oxide

Nasal nitric oxide The significance of nitric oxide (NO) in man was first investigated in the late 1980s, and NO has subsequently received great attention from biologists. Initially, this highly reactive gaseous molecule was seen as a mere noxious air pollutant. Closer investigation of its function in physiological processes, however, revealed that it took part in many different biologic processes. This multifunctionality led to its declaration as the molecule of the year in 1992. We now know NO to be a smooth‐muscle relaxant in blood vessels, an inhibitor of platelet aggregation, a neurotransmitter, and a mediator in local defense ( 2 , 3 ). In the airways, NO is an important molecule with different functions such as stimulation of ciliary motility, mediation in inflammation, bacteriostatic and virostatic activity, and regulation of bronchial airway tone and even pulmonary vascular tone ( 4–7 ). Further studies on other systems will probably reveal more processes in which NO plays a key role. Studies in healthy adults indicate that NO in nasal air is mainly produced in the epithelial cells of the nasal cavity, particularly in the paranasal sinuses ( 8 ). Many factors, such as smoking, drugs, physio‐logical factors, and nasal and paranasal disorder, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Allergy Wiley

Nasal nitric oxide

Allergy , Volume 56 (11) – Jan 1, 2001

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References (59)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0105-4538
eISSN
1398-9995
DOI
10.1034/j.1398-9995.2001.00145.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The significance of nitric oxide (NO) in man was first investigated in the late 1980s, and NO has subsequently received great attention from biologists. Initially, this highly reactive gaseous molecule was seen as a mere noxious air pollutant. Closer investigation of its function in physiological processes, however, revealed that it took part in many different biologic processes. This multifunctionality led to its declaration as the molecule of the year in 1992. We now know NO to be a smooth‐muscle relaxant in blood vessels, an inhibitor of platelet aggregation, a neurotransmitter, and a mediator in local defense ( 2 , 3 ). In the airways, NO is an important molecule with different functions such as stimulation of ciliary motility, mediation in inflammation, bacteriostatic and virostatic activity, and regulation of bronchial airway tone and even pulmonary vascular tone ( 4–7 ). Further studies on other systems will probably reveal more processes in which NO plays a key role. Studies in healthy adults indicate that NO in nasal air is mainly produced in the epithelial cells of the nasal cavity, particularly in the paranasal sinuses ( 8 ). Many factors, such as smoking, drugs, physio‐logical factors, and nasal and paranasal disorder,

Journal

AllergyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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