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Navigating Environmental Attitudes

Navigating Environmental Attitudes One of the anomalies of modern ecology is that it is the creation of two groups each of which seems barely aware of the existence of the other. The one studies the human community almost as if it were a separate entity, and calls its findings sociology, economics, and history. The other studies the plant and animal community, [and] comfortably relegates the hodge‐podge of politics to “the liberal arts.” The inevitable fusion of these two lines of thought will, perhaps, constitute the outstanding advance of the present century . Aldo Leopold, Berlin (1935) There has been progress toward the hopeful words Leopold penned 75 years ago regarding the fusion of ecological and social sciences (quoted in Meine 1988 ). Environmental sociology, environmental psychology, and resource economics have emerged within their respective disciplines. Journals for interdisciplinary studies of natural resources have been established. Integrated natural and social science training programs have been funded and students graduated. Natural scientists have stepped over disciplinary boundaries to conduct attitude studies. And, this is a problem. Although fundamentally important, attitudes are a difficult concept operationally and theoretically. The properties of an attitude are not those of a wolf or a fish or even http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Navigating Environmental Attitudes

Conservation Biology , Volume 26 (4) – Aug 1, 2012

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References (5)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
©2012 Society for Conservation Biology
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.2012.01892.x
pmid
22809349
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the anomalies of modern ecology is that it is the creation of two groups each of which seems barely aware of the existence of the other. The one studies the human community almost as if it were a separate entity, and calls its findings sociology, economics, and history. The other studies the plant and animal community, [and] comfortably relegates the hodge‐podge of politics to “the liberal arts.” The inevitable fusion of these two lines of thought will, perhaps, constitute the outstanding advance of the present century . Aldo Leopold, Berlin (1935) There has been progress toward the hopeful words Leopold penned 75 years ago regarding the fusion of ecological and social sciences (quoted in Meine 1988 ). Environmental sociology, environmental psychology, and resource economics have emerged within their respective disciplines. Journals for interdisciplinary studies of natural resources have been established. Integrated natural and social science training programs have been funded and students graduated. Natural scientists have stepped over disciplinary boundaries to conduct attitude studies. And, this is a problem. Although fundamentally important, attitudes are a difficult concept operationally and theoretically. The properties of an attitude are not those of a wolf or a fish or even

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2012

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