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Neonatal handling, behaviour and reproduction in Orange‐winged amazons and Cockatiels

Neonatal handling, behaviour and reproduction in Orange‐winged amazons and Cockatiels Studies of reproductive management of captive Orange‐winged amazons Amazona amazonica and Cockatiels Nymphicus hollandicus show that early behavioural experiences, specifically being handled by humans during the nestling stage, can influence not only tameness but also immune status and, in Cockatiels, adult reproductive performance. Behavioural studies also show that inactivity characterizes much of the time budget (c. 75–90%) of ♂ and ♀ members of breeding pairs of wild‐caught Orange‐winged amazons under typical captive conditions, even though serum sex‐steroid levels change dramatically during the course of a reproductive cycle. Other studies show that operant behaviour techniques can be used in monogamous parrots to study the reinforcing efficacy of visual access to conspecifics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

Neonatal handling, behaviour and reproduction in Orange‐winged amazons and Cockatiels

International Zoo Yearbook , Volume 37 (1) – Jan 1, 2000

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References (19)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1090.2000.tb00727.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Studies of reproductive management of captive Orange‐winged amazons Amazona amazonica and Cockatiels Nymphicus hollandicus show that early behavioural experiences, specifically being handled by humans during the nestling stage, can influence not only tameness but also immune status and, in Cockatiels, adult reproductive performance. Behavioural studies also show that inactivity characterizes much of the time budget (c. 75–90%) of ♂ and ♀ members of breeding pairs of wild‐caught Orange‐winged amazons under typical captive conditions, even though serum sex‐steroid levels change dramatically during the course of a reproductive cycle. Other studies show that operant behaviour techniques can be used in monogamous parrots to study the reinforcing efficacy of visual access to conspecifics.

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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