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Observations on Pacific boas Candoia spp, at Sydney Zoo

Observations on Pacific boas Candoia spp, at Sydney Zoo Candoia spp a t Sydney Zoo W I L L I A M H. T I M M I S Curator of Reptiles, Taronga Zoological Park Trust, Sydney, Australia" became interested in the wriggling action the boas Although boas are abundant in the Western did not strike. Pacific, little appears to have been recorded on their habits in captivity. The genus Candoia I decided to cover the cage floor with a deep layer of dead leaves. Immediately this was done (= Enygrus) has four species, Candoia australis, the boas buried themselves with just the tips of C. aspera, C. bibronii and C. carinata. their snouts showing above the surface. On During the spring of I 964 Sir Edward Hallstrom releasing several more skinks, which moved about was presented with several boas from the Solomon on the surface of the leaves, two boas, a carinata Islands region. After examining the scalation and comparing material in the Australian Museum it and an aspera, used their tails as lures and struck, was found that three species had been presentedtaking a large L. quoyii each. They continued to feed satisfactorily and several frogs Hyla caerulea, C. carinata, C . aspera and C. bibronii. H. peronii and H. lesueurii were also taken in this I was unable to find any information in the manner. literature on the feeding of these snakes except Subsequently, during August 1964, I was that of Loveridge (1948) who recorded that fortunate enough to collect a boa in Western several species of skinks were found in stomachs Samoa and found that its habitat was deep leaf of C. carinata. Several Lygosoma q. quoyii, L. mould and rotting vegetation. The boa was lying taeniolatum, L. guichenoti and small Lialis buried with just the tip of the head showing; burtonis were placed in with the boas but they presumably it was waiting for food. Since Emoia refused to feed and after a week I became anxious. cyanura and E. samoensis were quite common I noticed that they had very similar habits to the in the area, it is suggested that ski& and Death adder Acanthophis antarcticus antarcticus; possibly some frogs form the basic diet of these the boa's body becomes depressed to a remarkable most interesting and little-known snakes. degree when it is annoyed, it strikes rapidly and accurately over a short distance and on occasions REFERENCE the tail is used as a lure in almost the same way L O V E R I D G E , A . (1948): New Guinean reptiles and as that of the Death adder. The tail is held quite amphibians in the Museum of Comparative Zoology close .to the head and twitches and wriggles if and United States National Museum. BUN.Mus. camp. a lizard approaches. Although several skinks Zool. Haru. IOI : 307-430. * The author is now Curator of Mammals and Birds, North of England Zoological Society, Chester, GB. Notes on some tropidophid snakes in captivity M I C H A E L S. E D W A R D S Dallas Zoo, Dallas, Texas, USA One of the objectives of any zoological park is to attempt to display a wide variety of animal life. Certain forms are discarded, however, because of their small size and secretiveness. This is especially true in the case of reptiles. With this in mind, the staff at the Dallas Zoo reptile house constantly strive to find ways to display some of these forms in a way which will not be detrimental to their health and need of security. The small members of the genus Tropidophis are good examples of this. One specimen each of the Bimini ground boa http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

Observations on Pacific boas Candoia spp, at Sydney Zoo

International Zoo Yearbook , Volume 9 (1) – Jan 1, 1969

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References (1)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1969 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1090.1969.tb02611.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Candoia spp a t Sydney Zoo W I L L I A M H. T I M M I S Curator of Reptiles, Taronga Zoological Park Trust, Sydney, Australia" became interested in the wriggling action the boas Although boas are abundant in the Western did not strike. Pacific, little appears to have been recorded on their habits in captivity. The genus Candoia I decided to cover the cage floor with a deep layer of dead leaves. Immediately this was done (= Enygrus) has four species, Candoia australis, the boas buried themselves with just the tips of C. aspera, C. bibronii and C. carinata. their snouts showing above the surface. On During the spring of I 964 Sir Edward Hallstrom releasing several more skinks, which moved about was presented with several boas from the Solomon on the surface of the leaves, two boas, a carinata Islands region. After examining the scalation and comparing material in the Australian Museum it and an aspera, used their tails as lures and struck, was found that three species had been presentedtaking a large L. quoyii each. They continued to feed satisfactorily and several frogs Hyla caerulea, C. carinata, C . aspera and C. bibronii. H. peronii and H. lesueurii were also taken in this I was unable to find any information in the manner. literature on the feeding of these snakes except Subsequently, during August 1964, I was that of Loveridge (1948) who recorded that fortunate enough to collect a boa in Western several species of skinks were found in stomachs Samoa and found that its habitat was deep leaf of C. carinata. Several Lygosoma q. quoyii, L. mould and rotting vegetation. The boa was lying taeniolatum, L. guichenoti and small Lialis buried with just the tip of the head showing; burtonis were placed in with the boas but they presumably it was waiting for food. Since Emoia refused to feed and after a week I became anxious. cyanura and E. samoensis were quite common I noticed that they had very similar habits to the in the area, it is suggested that ski& and Death adder Acanthophis antarcticus antarcticus; possibly some frogs form the basic diet of these the boa's body becomes depressed to a remarkable most interesting and little-known snakes. degree when it is annoyed, it strikes rapidly and accurately over a short distance and on occasions REFERENCE the tail is used as a lure in almost the same way L O V E R I D G E , A . (1948): New Guinean reptiles and as that of the Death adder. The tail is held quite amphibians in the Museum of Comparative Zoology close .to the head and twitches and wriggles if and United States National Museum. BUN.Mus. camp. a lizard approaches. Although several skinks Zool. Haru. IOI : 307-430. * The author is now Curator of Mammals and Birds, North of England Zoological Society, Chester, GB. Notes on some tropidophid snakes in captivity M I C H A E L S. E D W A R D S Dallas Zoo, Dallas, Texas, USA One of the objectives of any zoological park is to attempt to display a wide variety of animal life. Certain forms are discarded, however, because of their small size and secretiveness. This is especially true in the case of reptiles. With this in mind, the staff at the Dallas Zoo reptile house constantly strive to find ways to display some of these forms in a way which will not be detrimental to their health and need of security. The small members of the genus Tropidophis are good examples of this. One specimen each of the Bimini ground boa

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1969

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