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Observations on the reproductive biology of the American ringed snake Leptodeira annulata at East Berlin Zoo

Observations on the reproductive biology of the American ringed snake Leptodeira annulata at East... security for the snake and visibility for the public is provided. A small, square box made of cement, with a glass top embedded in it, is sunk in the cage's substratum. This provides the snake with all the security it needs. Darkness seems to play no part in this snake's requirements as the cage is very brightly lit and it seems content to wedge itself tightly in this retreat. On occasions the snake will wander from its retreat, especially just prior to feeding day. Both snakes are maintained on a diet of Anolis carolinensis. In the case of the Cayman Island ground boa, the lizard is held by the hind legs and the forepart of the body is thrust into the glass-topped retreat box, where it is immediately seized. Constriction has been noted in both snakes, but usually the lizard is grasped in the lung region and is firmly held until its struggles cease. The Bimini ground boa, which usually eats during the night, has a lizard simply placed in the jar with it. On a few occasions the lizard has been seized immediately, but only if it ventures very close to the edge of the retreat rock. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

Observations on the reproductive biology of the American ringed snake Leptodeira annulata at East Berlin Zoo

International Zoo Yearbook , Volume 9 (1) – Jan 1, 1969

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References (6)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1969 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1090.1969.tb02613.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

security for the snake and visibility for the public is provided. A small, square box made of cement, with a glass top embedded in it, is sunk in the cage's substratum. This provides the snake with all the security it needs. Darkness seems to play no part in this snake's requirements as the cage is very brightly lit and it seems content to wedge itself tightly in this retreat. On occasions the snake will wander from its retreat, especially just prior to feeding day. Both snakes are maintained on a diet of Anolis carolinensis. In the case of the Cayman Island ground boa, the lizard is held by the hind legs and the forepart of the body is thrust into the glass-topped retreat box, where it is immediately seized. Constriction has been noted in both snakes, but usually the lizard is grasped in the lung region and is firmly held until its struggles cease. The Bimini ground boa, which usually eats during the night, has a lizard simply placed in the jar with it. On a few occasions the lizard has been seized immediately, but only if it ventures very close to the edge of the retreat rock.

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1969

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