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Origin of Current‐Controlled Negative Differential Resistance Modes and the Emergence of Composite Characteristics with High Complexity

Origin of Current‐Controlled Negative Differential Resistance Modes and the Emergence of... Current‐controlled negative differential resistance has significant potential as a fundamental building block in brain‐inspired neuromorphic computing. However, achieving the desired negative differential resistance characteristics, which is crucial for practical implementation, remains challenging due to a lack of consensus on the underlying mechanism and design criteria. Here, a material‐independent model of current‐controlled negative differential resistance is reported to explain a broad range of characteristics, including the origin of the discontinuous snap‐back response observed in many transition metal oxides. This is achieved by explicitly accounting for a non‐uniform current distribution in the oxide film and its impact on the effective circuit of the device rather than a material‐specific phase transition. The predictions of the model are then compared with experimental observations to show that the continuous S‐type and discontinuous snap‐back characteristics serve as fundamental building blocks for composite behavior with higher complexity. Finally, the potential of our approach is demonstrated for predicting and engineering unconventional compound behavior with novel functionality for emerging electronic and neuromorphic computing applications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advanced Functional Materials Wiley

Origin of Current‐Controlled Negative Differential Resistance Modes and the Emergence of Composite Characteristics with High Complexity

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References (35)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2019 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
1616-301X
eISSN
1616-3028
DOI
10.1002/adfm.201905060
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current‐controlled negative differential resistance has significant potential as a fundamental building block in brain‐inspired neuromorphic computing. However, achieving the desired negative differential resistance characteristics, which is crucial for practical implementation, remains challenging due to a lack of consensus on the underlying mechanism and design criteria. Here, a material‐independent model of current‐controlled negative differential resistance is reported to explain a broad range of characteristics, including the origin of the discontinuous snap‐back response observed in many transition metal oxides. This is achieved by explicitly accounting for a non‐uniform current distribution in the oxide film and its impact on the effective circuit of the device rather than a material‐specific phase transition. The predictions of the model are then compared with experimental observations to show that the continuous S‐type and discontinuous snap‐back characteristics serve as fundamental building blocks for composite behavior with higher complexity. Finally, the potential of our approach is demonstrated for predicting and engineering unconventional compound behavior with novel functionality for emerging electronic and neuromorphic computing applications.

Journal

Advanced Functional MaterialsWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2019

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

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