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Policy Transfer in the European Union: Institutional Isomorphism as a Source of Legitimacy

Policy Transfer in the European Union: Institutional Isomorphism as a Source of Legitimacy This article examines public policy in the European Union (EU) by drawing upon the framework of policy transfer, which has been recently refined by comparativists, and the concept of isomorphism developed within organizational theory. Three case studies—namely, the single currency, tax policy and media ownership policy—are discussed and compared with the aim of assessing the potential of isomorphism for the analysis of policy dif‐fusion. The author argues that European institutions, which have a serious limitation in terms of legitimacy, stimulate policy transfer by catalyzing isomorphic processes. Policy transfer, however, is constrained when there are no national cases to be imitated. Yet European institutions, most notably the European Commission, can overcome the problem by “inseminating” solutions into national political systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Governance Wiley

Policy Transfer in the European Union: Institutional Isomorphism as a Source of Legitimacy

Governance , Volume 13 (1) – Jan 1, 2000

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References (45)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0952-1895
eISSN
1468-0491
DOI
10.1111/0952-1895.00122
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article examines public policy in the European Union (EU) by drawing upon the framework of policy transfer, which has been recently refined by comparativists, and the concept of isomorphism developed within organizational theory. Three case studies—namely, the single currency, tax policy and media ownership policy—are discussed and compared with the aim of assessing the potential of isomorphism for the analysis of policy dif‐fusion. The author argues that European institutions, which have a serious limitation in terms of legitimacy, stimulate policy transfer by catalyzing isomorphic processes. Policy transfer, however, is constrained when there are no national cases to be imitated. Yet European institutions, most notably the European Commission, can overcome the problem by “inseminating” solutions into national political systems.

Journal

GovernanceWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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