Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Psychological impact of genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

Psychological impact of genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer The psychological impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed in 114 individuals (32 carriers and 82 non-carriers) attending familial cancer clinics, using mailed self-administered questionnaires prior to, 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months after carrier status disclosure. Compared to baseline, carriers showed a significant increase in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer 2 weeks (t = 2.49; p = 0.014) and a significant decrease in mean depression scores 2 weeks post-notification of result (t = −3.98; p < 0.001) and 4 months post-notification of result (t = −3.22; p = 0.002). For non-carriers, significant decreases in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer were observed at all follow-up assessment time points relative to baseline. Non-carriers also showed significant decreases from baseline in mean depression scores 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months post-notification. Significant decreases from baseline for mean state anxiety scores were also observed for non-carriers 2 weeks post-notification (t = −3.99; p < 0.001). These data indicate that predictive genetic testing for HNPCC leads to psychological benefits amongst non-carriers, and no adverse psychological outcomes were observed amongst carriers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Genetics Wiley

Psychological impact of genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/psychological-impact-of-genetic-testing-for-hereditary-non-polyposis-dxLD9U07Mh

References (50)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004
ISSN
0009-9163
eISSN
1399-0004
DOI
10.1111/j.1399-0004.2004.00339.x
pmid
15521977
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The psychological impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed in 114 individuals (32 carriers and 82 non-carriers) attending familial cancer clinics, using mailed self-administered questionnaires prior to, 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months after carrier status disclosure. Compared to baseline, carriers showed a significant increase in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer 2 weeks (t = 2.49; p = 0.014) and a significant decrease in mean depression scores 2 weeks post-notification of result (t = −3.98; p < 0.001) and 4 months post-notification of result (t = −3.22; p = 0.002). For non-carriers, significant decreases in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer were observed at all follow-up assessment time points relative to baseline. Non-carriers also showed significant decreases from baseline in mean depression scores 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months post-notification. Significant decreases from baseline for mean state anxiety scores were also observed for non-carriers 2 weeks post-notification (t = −3.99; p < 0.001). These data indicate that predictive genetic testing for HNPCC leads to psychological benefits amongst non-carriers, and no adverse psychological outcomes were observed amongst carriers.

Journal

Clinical GeneticsWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2004

Keywords: genetic testing; hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer; psychological impact

There are no references for this article.