Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Realism in paediatric emergency simulations: A prospective comparison of in situ, low fidelity and centre‐based, high fidelity scenarios

Realism in paediatric emergency simulations: A prospective comparison of in situ, low fidelity... Key findingsSome aspects of in situ simulations may be perceived as less ‘real’ than centre‐based simulationsThere was no difference in engagement or learning between the modalities.In situ simulations utilising the ALSi, combined with a low fidelity manikin, provide effective educational realism.IntroductionAn exciting simulation that captures the imagination, triggering physiological responses and the execution of ingrained clinical algorithms, is a social and psychologic endeavour. Reality can be defined in three domains: physical, conceptual and emotional/experiential. Physical realism is what we can see and touch for example the manikins. The conceptual domain involves ‘if – then’ algorithms concerned with problem solving, decision making and prediction for example if the patient stops breathing the oxygen saturations will fall. The emotional and experiential domain relates to the holistic experience of the simulation and can influence the participants’ positive or negative feelings. As educators we strive to create reality as we assume that the more ‘real’ a scenario is the better the learning outcomes for the participants and ultimately our patients.The current evidence base for effective training supports local, unit‐based and multi‐professional training, with appropriate manikins, and practice‐based tools to support the best care. Programmes using these principles have shown not only improved learning http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Emergency Medicine Australasia Wiley

Realism in paediatric emergency simulations: A prospective comparison of in situ, low fidelity and centre‐based, high fidelity scenarios

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/realism-in-paediatric-emergency-simulations-a-prospective-comparison-oE6hS0XzRI

References (25)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine & Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine
ISSN
1742-6731
eISSN
1742-6723
DOI
10.1111/1742-6723.12885
pmid
29143446
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Key findingsSome aspects of in situ simulations may be perceived as less ‘real’ than centre‐based simulationsThere was no difference in engagement or learning between the modalities.In situ simulations utilising the ALSi, combined with a low fidelity manikin, provide effective educational realism.IntroductionAn exciting simulation that captures the imagination, triggering physiological responses and the execution of ingrained clinical algorithms, is a social and psychologic endeavour. Reality can be defined in three domains: physical, conceptual and emotional/experiential. Physical realism is what we can see and touch for example the manikins. The conceptual domain involves ‘if – then’ algorithms concerned with problem solving, decision making and prediction for example if the patient stops breathing the oxygen saturations will fall. The emotional and experiential domain relates to the holistic experience of the simulation and can influence the participants’ positive or negative feelings. As educators we strive to create reality as we assume that the more ‘real’ a scenario is the better the learning outcomes for the participants and ultimately our patients.The current evidence base for effective training supports local, unit‐based and multi‐professional training, with appropriate manikins, and practice‐based tools to support the best care. Programmes using these principles have shown not only improved learning

Journal

Emergency Medicine AustralasiaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

There are no references for this article.