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Reference intervals for hematology, serum biochemistry, and basic clinical findings in free‐ranging Chinese Pangolin ( Manis pentadactyla ) from Taiwan

Reference intervals for hematology, serum biochemistry, and basic clinical findings in... Background There are 8 species of Pangolins found in Asia and Africa. Among them, the Chinese Pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) is an endangered insectivorous mammal found only in Asia. Hematology and serum chemistry reference intervals are critical for evaluating an animal's well‐being and can be useful for clinical diagnostic purposes. Currently, there are no such reference intervals available for any Pangolin species. Objective The purpose of the present study was to establish reference intervals for hematology and serum biochemical analytes, and some basic clinical findings, in Chinese Pangolins. Methods Reference intervals for the hematology and serum chemistry variables, and basic clinical findings (body weight, heart rate, body temperature, blood oxygen saturation) were collected from 100 clinically healthy Chinese Pangolins (51 males and 49 females) using parametric and nonparametric percentile methods. In addition, seasonal, age‐related, and sexual differences for all variables were statistically analyzed. Results No significant differences in the reference intervals were found between males and females, except for body weight. However, significant seasonal differences were observed for heart rate, body temperature, serum ALT and lipase activities, and phosphate concentrations. The variables, which were significantly different between adult and sub‐adult Pangolins were heart rate, MCH, creatinine, total protein, phosphate, glucose, and potassium concentration, and amylase activity. Seasonal and age group differences should be taken into consideration when using these reference intervals. Conclusions The findings from the present study represent a valuable resource for assessing the health of Chinese Pangolins, and contribute toward the conservation of this endangered mammal. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Veterinary Clinical Pathology Wiley

Reference intervals for hematology, serum biochemistry, and basic clinical findings in free‐ranging Chinese Pangolin ( Manis pentadactyla ) from Taiwan

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References (34)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 The American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology
ISSN
0275-6382
eISSN
1939-165X
DOI
10.1111/vcp.12273
pmid
26175074
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background There are 8 species of Pangolins found in Asia and Africa. Among them, the Chinese Pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) is an endangered insectivorous mammal found only in Asia. Hematology and serum chemistry reference intervals are critical for evaluating an animal's well‐being and can be useful for clinical diagnostic purposes. Currently, there are no such reference intervals available for any Pangolin species. Objective The purpose of the present study was to establish reference intervals for hematology and serum biochemical analytes, and some basic clinical findings, in Chinese Pangolins. Methods Reference intervals for the hematology and serum chemistry variables, and basic clinical findings (body weight, heart rate, body temperature, blood oxygen saturation) were collected from 100 clinically healthy Chinese Pangolins (51 males and 49 females) using parametric and nonparametric percentile methods. In addition, seasonal, age‐related, and sexual differences for all variables were statistically analyzed. Results No significant differences in the reference intervals were found between males and females, except for body weight. However, significant seasonal differences were observed for heart rate, body temperature, serum ALT and lipase activities, and phosphate concentrations. The variables, which were significantly different between adult and sub‐adult Pangolins were heart rate, MCH, creatinine, total protein, phosphate, glucose, and potassium concentration, and amylase activity. Seasonal and age group differences should be taken into consideration when using these reference intervals. Conclusions The findings from the present study represent a valuable resource for assessing the health of Chinese Pangolins, and contribute toward the conservation of this endangered mammal.

Journal

Veterinary Clinical PathologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2015

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