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Reproduction of the Brown caiman at the San Antonio Zoo

Reproduction of the Brown caiman at the San Antonio Zoo of a strand of millet from a broom. This method not only protects the fingers but is easier on the mouths of the young. Twelve months after hatching the three surviving young had attained an average length of 533 mm. CONCLUSION In my opinion the poor rate of hatching was in part due to our disturbing the nests too early. However, Some 85% ofthe eggs were infertile, and this was probably because most of the were still immature. Should breeding Occur in future years, it is our intention not to open the for inspection in the early stages and to collect the eggs for incubation eight weeks after nesting activity is observed. Q Q Manuscript submitted 9 April 1980 Reproduction of the Brown caiman Caiman crocodilusfuscus a t the San Antonio Zoo ERIK HOLMBACK Reptile Department, San Antonio Zoological Gardens, San Antonio, Texas 78212, USA In 1977 the San Antonio Zoological Gardens possessed 1.1 adult Brown caimans Caiman crocodilus fuscus. The natural range of these small crocodilians is from south-westem Mexico, through western Central America to northern Colombia (Neill, 1971). ADULTS and remained at a steady temperature of 23-24°C the year round due to an artesian well. BREEDING http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

Reproduction of the Brown caiman at the San Antonio Zoo

International Zoo Yearbook , Volume 21 (1) – Jan 1, 1981

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References (8)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1981 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1090.1981.tb01950.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

of a strand of millet from a broom. This method not only protects the fingers but is easier on the mouths of the young. Twelve months after hatching the three surviving young had attained an average length of 533 mm. CONCLUSION In my opinion the poor rate of hatching was in part due to our disturbing the nests too early. However, Some 85% ofthe eggs were infertile, and this was probably because most of the were still immature. Should breeding Occur in future years, it is our intention not to open the for inspection in the early stages and to collect the eggs for incubation eight weeks after nesting activity is observed. Q Q Manuscript submitted 9 April 1980 Reproduction of the Brown caiman Caiman crocodilusfuscus a t the San Antonio Zoo ERIK HOLMBACK Reptile Department, San Antonio Zoological Gardens, San Antonio, Texas 78212, USA In 1977 the San Antonio Zoological Gardens possessed 1.1 adult Brown caimans Caiman crocodilus fuscus. The natural range of these small crocodilians is from south-westem Mexico, through western Central America to northern Colombia (Neill, 1971). ADULTS and remained at a steady temperature of 23-24°C the year round due to an artesian well. BREEDING

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1981

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