Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Researching Domestic Violence Against Women: Methodological and Ethical Considerations

Researching Domestic Violence Against Women: Methodological and Ethical Considerations The results of three population‐based studies on violence against women in Nicaragua are compared in this article. Two of the studies were regional in scope (Leon and Managua) and focused specifically on women's experiences of violence, whereas the third study was a Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) conducted with a nationally representative sample of women. The lifetime prevalence estimates for women's undergoing physical violence from a partner were significantly higher in the Leon study (52 percent) and Managua study (69 percent), compared with that given in the DHS (28 percent). Possible explanations for the differences are examined through pooled multivariate logistic regression analysis, as well as analysis ofsix focus‐group discussions cairied out with field‐workers and staff from the three studies. The most important differences that were found concerned ethical and safety procedures and the interview setting. The results indicate that prevalence estimates for violence are highly sensitive to methodological factors, and that underreporting is a significant threat to validity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Family Planning Wiley

Researching Domestic Violence Against Women: Methodological and Ethical Considerations

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/researching-domestic-violence-against-women-methodological-and-ethical-efgYsxs5eT

References (41)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0039-3665
eISSN
1728-4465
DOI
10.1111/j.1728-4465.2001.00001.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The results of three population‐based studies on violence against women in Nicaragua are compared in this article. Two of the studies were regional in scope (Leon and Managua) and focused specifically on women's experiences of violence, whereas the third study was a Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) conducted with a nationally representative sample of women. The lifetime prevalence estimates for women's undergoing physical violence from a partner were significantly higher in the Leon study (52 percent) and Managua study (69 percent), compared with that given in the DHS (28 percent). Possible explanations for the differences are examined through pooled multivariate logistic regression analysis, as well as analysis ofsix focus‐group discussions cairied out with field‐workers and staff from the three studies. The most important differences that were found concerned ethical and safety procedures and the interview setting. The results indicate that prevalence estimates for violence are highly sensitive to methodological factors, and that underreporting is a significant threat to validity.

Journal

Studies in Family PlanningWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.