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Seasonal and perennial water populations of an endemic crayfish differ in behavioural responses to drying but not metabolism

Seasonal and perennial water populations of an endemic crayfish differ in behavioural responses... Crayfish perform important roles within freshwater ecosystems, including in regions where global warming is causing prolonged drying of waterbodies. However, little is known about responses of crayfish to habitat drying from both a behavioural and physiological perspective. We compared burrowing ability, survival and metabolism of the crayfish Cherax quinquecarinatus from a seasonal stream and a perennial stream. Burrowing ability and crayfish survival were quantified in a mesocosm experiment contrasting sediment type (sand vs. clay/sand mixture) and water regime. Aerobic scope, standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) were also compared using intermittent flow respirometry. Crayfish from the seasonal stream showed limited burrowing ability but higher survival in the drying treatment, while the perennial stream crayfish burrowed strongly in the clay/sand sediment. Higher survival suggests that crayfish from seasonal streams might be physiologically better adapted to drying. Larger crayfish burrowed more proficiently, reaching the saturated hyporheic zone refuge in the clay/sand sediment treatment. SMR/MMR/aerobic scope did not differ between populations or respirometry runs; however, SMR differed between individuals, perhaps due to personality traits. There was a significant negative relationship between MMR/aerobic scope and weight. Sediment type may limit C. quinquecarinatus burrowing and persistence through drying. Crayfish populations did not differ in terms of metabolism; however, crayfish from seasonal habitats may possess more efficient physiological adaptations to drying. This study highlights the need for greater research attention on the effects of climatic drying on both the behaviour and the physiology of species exposed to climate change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecohydrology Wiley

Seasonal and perennial water populations of an endemic crayfish differ in behavioural responses to drying but not metabolism

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References (91)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2023 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1936-0584
eISSN
1936-0592
DOI
10.1002/eco.2566
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Crayfish perform important roles within freshwater ecosystems, including in regions where global warming is causing prolonged drying of waterbodies. However, little is known about responses of crayfish to habitat drying from both a behavioural and physiological perspective. We compared burrowing ability, survival and metabolism of the crayfish Cherax quinquecarinatus from a seasonal stream and a perennial stream. Burrowing ability and crayfish survival were quantified in a mesocosm experiment contrasting sediment type (sand vs. clay/sand mixture) and water regime. Aerobic scope, standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) were also compared using intermittent flow respirometry. Crayfish from the seasonal stream showed limited burrowing ability but higher survival in the drying treatment, while the perennial stream crayfish burrowed strongly in the clay/sand sediment. Higher survival suggests that crayfish from seasonal streams might be physiologically better adapted to drying. Larger crayfish burrowed more proficiently, reaching the saturated hyporheic zone refuge in the clay/sand sediment treatment. SMR/MMR/aerobic scope did not differ between populations or respirometry runs; however, SMR differed between individuals, perhaps due to personality traits. There was a significant negative relationship between MMR/aerobic scope and weight. Sediment type may limit C. quinquecarinatus burrowing and persistence through drying. Crayfish populations did not differ in terms of metabolism; however, crayfish from seasonal habitats may possess more efficient physiological adaptations to drying. This study highlights the need for greater research attention on the effects of climatic drying on both the behaviour and the physiology of species exposed to climate change.

Journal

EcohydrologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2023

Keywords: body size; burrowing; Cherax quinquecarinatus; climate change; drying; respirometry; temperature

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