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Segmentation of the Angler Population by Catch Preference, Participation, and Experience: A Management‐Oriented Application of Recreation Specialization

Segmentation of the Angler Population by Catch Preference, Participation, and Experience: A... Segmentation of the angler population by catch preference. experience, and participation can help fishery managers understand diversity in consumptive preferences and attitudes among recreational anglers. Estimates of the sire and number of angler groups can also provide an understanding of the relative demand for the different types of fishing experiences sought. These types of angler information are often collected with mailed surveys, but segments of the angler population may be underrepresented because of nonresponse bias. A 10‐page mail questionnaire was sent to a stratified random sample of 9,981 Texas fishing license holders. Information was collected on fishing participation. fishing experience, club membership, tournament participation. activity‐specific attitudes, and opinions on fishery management options. Response rate was 62% (exclusive of surveys that could not be delivered). Adjustments for nonresponse were made with response propensity stratification. Groups of anglers were formed by conducting four hierarchical cluster analyses of six specialization variables. Nonhierarchical cluster analysis was used to determine the size of the seven groups of anglers. Groups had diverse attitudes pertaining to the size of fish sought, number of fish sought, importance of keeping the catch, and importance of catching “something.” Participation and experience also varied among groups. Tournament participation and club membership were most prevalent among higher‐specialization anglers. Opinions on management options were significantly different among groups and reflected diverse consumptive orientations. Results agree with previous findings that different anglers seek different fishing experiences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png North American Journal of Fisheries Management Wiley

Segmentation of the Angler Population by Catch Preference, Participation, and Experience: A Management‐Oriented Application of Recreation Specialization

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References (11)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Fisheries Society
ISSN
0275-5947
eISSN
1548-8675
DOI
10.1577/1548-8675(1997)017<0001:SOTAPB>2.3.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Segmentation of the angler population by catch preference. experience, and participation can help fishery managers understand diversity in consumptive preferences and attitudes among recreational anglers. Estimates of the sire and number of angler groups can also provide an understanding of the relative demand for the different types of fishing experiences sought. These types of angler information are often collected with mailed surveys, but segments of the angler population may be underrepresented because of nonresponse bias. A 10‐page mail questionnaire was sent to a stratified random sample of 9,981 Texas fishing license holders. Information was collected on fishing participation. fishing experience, club membership, tournament participation. activity‐specific attitudes, and opinions on fishery management options. Response rate was 62% (exclusive of surveys that could not be delivered). Adjustments for nonresponse were made with response propensity stratification. Groups of anglers were formed by conducting four hierarchical cluster analyses of six specialization variables. Nonhierarchical cluster analysis was used to determine the size of the seven groups of anglers. Groups had diverse attitudes pertaining to the size of fish sought, number of fish sought, importance of keeping the catch, and importance of catching “something.” Participation and experience also varied among groups. Tournament participation and club membership were most prevalent among higher‐specialization anglers. Opinions on management options were significantly different among groups and reflected diverse consumptive orientations. Results agree with previous findings that different anglers seek different fishing experiences.

Journal

North American Journal of Fisheries ManagementWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1997

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