Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Seizing Attention: Devices and Desires

Seizing Attention: Devices and Desires Seizing Attention: Devices and Desires Barbara Maria Stafford The message we listen for so carefully must be mediated through our own experience, our personality, our heredity, our inner needs. Can we ever break free of the devices and desires of our own hearts? (P. D. James, 1989) Whatever else early modern technological devices did, they artfully vied for our undivided attention. Mirrors, cameras obscura, microscopes, telescopes, Claude glasses, kaleidoscopes, clockwork automata, as well as the optical telegraph and the pinhole camera, perceptually and cognitively focused our selective attention. Today, conscious attention – that narrow band of brain function enabling people to be more than fl eetingly aware of what they are holding in mind – is becoming scarce. Not surprisingly, then, this precious frontal-lobe real estate (estimated to be only 10 per cent of our total cognitive horsepower) has become the kind worth selling. Swift electrical patterns of information, quickly vanishing into distractions and inattention, comprise the divided terrain competed for by a dizzying array of software and hardware. Digital apps and optical apparatus abound as the revolutionary tools of targeted marketing. Signifi cantly, this induced noticing is paid for by ‘the attention we offer to providers who track http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Art History Wiley

Seizing Attention: Devices and Desires

Art History , Volume 39 (2) – Apr 1, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/seizing-attention-devices-and-desires-WchTjuk546

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Association of Art Historians 2016
ISSN
0141-6790
eISSN
1467-8365
DOI
10.1111/1467-8365.12245
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Seizing Attention: Devices and Desires Barbara Maria Stafford The message we listen for so carefully must be mediated through our own experience, our personality, our heredity, our inner needs. Can we ever break free of the devices and desires of our own hearts? (P. D. James, 1989) Whatever else early modern technological devices did, they artfully vied for our undivided attention. Mirrors, cameras obscura, microscopes, telescopes, Claude glasses, kaleidoscopes, clockwork automata, as well as the optical telegraph and the pinhole camera, perceptually and cognitively focused our selective attention. Today, conscious attention – that narrow band of brain function enabling people to be more than fl eetingly aware of what they are holding in mind – is becoming scarce. Not surprisingly, then, this precious frontal-lobe real estate (estimated to be only 10 per cent of our total cognitive horsepower) has become the kind worth selling. Swift electrical patterns of information, quickly vanishing into distractions and inattention, comprise the divided terrain competed for by a dizzying array of software and hardware. Digital apps and optical apparatus abound as the revolutionary tools of targeted marketing. Signifi cantly, this induced noticing is paid for by ‘the attention we offer to providers who track

Journal

Art HistoryWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.