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Selenium deficiency increases susceptibility to glutamate‐induced excitotoxicity

Selenium deficiency increases susceptibility to glutamate‐induced excitotoxicity Excitotoxic brain lesions, such as stroke and epilepsy, lead to increasing destruction of neurons hours after the insult. The deadly cascade of events involves detrimental actions by free radicals and the activation of proapoptotic transcription factors, which finally result in neuronal destruction. Here, we provide direct evidence that the nutritionally essential trace element selenium has a pivotal role in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic lesions. First, we observed in neuronal cell cultures that addition of selenium in the form of selenite within the physiological range protects against excitotoxic insults and even attenuates primary damage. The neuroprotective effect of selenium is not directly mediated via antioxidative effects of selenite but requires de novo protein synthesis. Gel shift analysis demonstrates that this effect is connected to the inhibition of glutamate‐induced NF‐κB and AP‐1 activation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that selenium deficiency in vivo results in a massive increase in susceptibility to kainate‐induced seizures and cell loss. These findings indicate the importance of selenium for prevention and therapy of excitotoxic brain damage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The FASEB journal Wiley

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References (32)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
ISSN
0892-6638
eISSN
1530-6860
DOI
10.1096/fj.02-0067fje
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Excitotoxic brain lesions, such as stroke and epilepsy, lead to increasing destruction of neurons hours after the insult. The deadly cascade of events involves detrimental actions by free radicals and the activation of proapoptotic transcription factors, which finally result in neuronal destruction. Here, we provide direct evidence that the nutritionally essential trace element selenium has a pivotal role in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic lesions. First, we observed in neuronal cell cultures that addition of selenium in the form of selenite within the physiological range protects against excitotoxic insults and even attenuates primary damage. The neuroprotective effect of selenium is not directly mediated via antioxidative effects of selenite but requires de novo protein synthesis. Gel shift analysis demonstrates that this effect is connected to the inhibition of glutamate‐induced NF‐κB and AP‐1 activation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that selenium deficiency in vivo results in a massive increase in susceptibility to kainate‐induced seizures and cell loss. These findings indicate the importance of selenium for prevention and therapy of excitotoxic brain damage.

Journal

The FASEB journalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2003

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

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